The dark and windy storm that blew over Dublin's fifth annual Relay For Life last Saturday didn't stop participants from fighting cancer.

The dark and windy storm that blew over Dublin's fifth annual Relay For Life last Saturday didn't stop participants from fighting cancer.

They found shelter inside Jerome High School's gym, then resumed the event about an hour later after the storm passed.

Stephanie Reed, the event chairperson and a cancer survivor, said the situation was a lot like fighting cancer.

"You have to deal with the storm," she said. "There are always storms that blow up when you're fighting cancer."

At this year's event, more than 40 teams worked together to try to beat the disease that the American Cancer Society estimates will kill 566,000 Americans this year.

Angie McDaniel of Plain City donned a "Colyn's Crew" T-shirt with a picture of her 5-year-old son, Colyn, who is battling cancer.

On Oct. 6, he was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a cancer of the soft tissue found most often in children.

McDaniel said she got involved with Dublin Relay For Life after she searched online for an event for cancer survivors near their home.

"We talked about it, and we told (Colyn) there would be other survivors there," she said. "He thought that was pretty cool."

This was the eighth time Wendy Marino participated in a Relay For Life event. She has walked at the Dublin event for two years.

Marino, whose shirt read "Kiristi Tribe," was there to honor her mother, Kiristi Miller, a three-time breast cancer survivor.

"I'm just hoping to find a cure -- hoping that no other daughter has to see their parent go through what I had to see my mom go through," Marino said.

She also said she thought the event this year was exciting, because so many more young people were involved.

Brittanee Barton worked as a youth ambassador for this year's Relay For Life.

The 16-year-old student from Jerome High School said she got involved with planning about six months ago.

"My grandpa had cancer about a year ago," Barton said. "I thought this would be a good cause to get involved with."

Jenn Bash, who works on staff for the American Cancer Society, said the Dublin event is very close to her heart.

The Dublin resident founded "Team Judy" in honor of her mother, who died from cancer in 2000.

"We started a team, and I asked the person in my position now how I could get involved," she said. "This race has a special spot for me."

From that day on, Bash has been overseeing Relay For Life events all around central Ohio.

Reed said the Dublin event raised $52,370 this year. Because of online donations, the event raised more than $40,000 well before Saturday's relay.

"This is already $10,000 more than last year," she said. "The growth this year was absolutely spectacular."