Franklin County health officials discovered the West Nile virus last week in southwestern Dublin near the intersection of Avery and Woerner-Temple roads. It's the first case found in the city this year.

Franklin County health officials discovered the West Nile virus last week in southwestern Dublin near the intersection of Avery and Woerner-Temple roads. It's the first case found in the city this year.

Spraying occurred last week south of Post Road, east of Houchard Road, west of Interstate 270 and north of Hayden Run Road.

For the spraying to be effective "it has to be done when the mosquitoes are in flight, which is at dusk," said Ron Burns, director of streets and utilities. "A pickup truck drives around with a machine in the back that sprays out an ultra-low volume spray. The amount of chemicals you'd find in your typical household can of Raid yard fog is the same amount of chemical the ultra-low volume spray uses to treat 20 acres."

It's typical to see the virus in mosquitoes this time of year, and Dublin usually has a couple of cases annually, Burns said. June's record-breaking rainfall also contributed to the increased mosquito population.

Dublin contracted this year with Franklin County and Vector Disease Control Inc. for a mosquito prevention program. The county focuses primarily on prevention and reacts to situations when necessary.

To kill immature insects before they grow into biting adults, Vector Disease Control has placed more than 500 larvacides around Dublin and checks the traps weekly. It's more traps than Dublin has deployed in previous years.

"I am very pleased with Franklin County Board of Health and VDCI's management of the mosquito program in Dublin thus far this year," Burns said. "They've been extremely responsive to Dublin residents."

People contract West Nile after being bitten by an infected mosquito that picked up the virus from feeding on infected birds. Most people who are infected never become sick and some develop flu-like symptoms, but in rare cases the virus can be deadly, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The key to stopping the spread of West Nile is prevention, Burns said. Residents can take precautions including repairing leaky pipes and faucets; unclogging gutters; plugging holes in trees or anywhere else water can collect; and rinsing and cleaning dog dishes, birdbaths, baby pools and other areas of standing water.

For more information or to make a complaint, call (614) 462-BITE or go to www.franklincountyohio.gov/health.

bdunlap@thisweeknews.com