Dublin City Schools Superintendent David Axner, along with other district officials and members of the district's bond-levy campaign committee, have met with dozens of school and community groups over the past six weeks, answering questions about the Nov. 4 operating levy and bond issue on the ballot.

Dublin City Schools Superintendent David Axner, along with other district officials and members of the district's bond-levy campaign committee, have met with dozens of school and community groups over the past six weeks, answering questions about the Nov. 4 operating levy and bond issue on the ballot.

Nowhere, Axner said, have they faced organized opposition to the $50-million bond and 7.9-mill operating levy.

Not that people aren't voicing opposition, he said.

Those people fall into two main categories.

The first one is the economy and people's personal finances, Axner said.

"We don't argue with them about that, other than to point out the importance of maintaining a good school district. It is up to each individual to figure out for themselves what they can afford," he said.

The levy will cost the owner of a home with an assessed valuation of $200,000 an additional $484 annually in property taxes beginning in January 2010, according to Dublin Treasurer Steve Osborne. The bond will not raise taxes, he said.

The other type of opponent they encounter is someone who has a "personal issue with a school, staff member or program and are confusing that with a 'no' vote on the Nov. 4 issue," he said.

"We try to work through that problem with them and tell them it shouldn't take the place or strength of voting 'yes'," Axner said.

The Villager met recently with two groups of senior citizens. The district worries senior citizens will not vote for the ballot issue because they have no children in the schools.

But many do have grandchildren, such as Don and Helen Van Culin, who live at the Dublin Retirement Village. Some are also members of the superintendent's Senior Council.

An increase in property taxes will ultimately trickle down as a rent increase, Helen Van Culin said, but that shouldn't be the primary reason to vote no at the polls.

"Everybody's felt sorry for seniors all these years, but the way I see it most of the seniors have money to spend," said Al Koerner, who also lives at Dublin Retirement Village and has had grandchildren in Dublin schools.

"Just because the economy is down is not a reason not to support your schools because that is the basis for keeping your country going," he said. "People need to sit back and get their priorities straight. Do you go out and spend, spend, spend on yourself or do you support your community and your schools and keep your future?" he said.

Elizabeth Noblitt is a parent and grandmother of former Dublin students, was a substitute teacher in Dublin and lives in the district, formerly in a home but now at Trillium Place. She also is a member of the Senior Council.

"I think people get a great deal from Dublin schools," she said.

"In the informal conversations I've had here, I've never had a negative reaction (concerning the upcoming school ballot issue)," said Bill Booth, a former educator and member of the Senior Council. "I think the reason why, these are all seasoned people. They've been through the good and the bad. They've raised children. Have grandchildren. They've been in contact with schools all their lives. I don't think you'll find many residents of Trillium Place that will have a negative reaction to schools."