Dublin City Council heard the first reading last week of an economic development agreement that could bring a cancer treatment known as proton therapy to Dublin.

Dublin City Council heard the first reading last week of an economic development agreement that could bring a cancer treatment known as proton therapy to Dublin.

Under the agreement, a cancer treatment facility specializing in proton therapy would be built in the Central Ohio Innovation Center near the U.S. Route 33, state Route 161 and Post Road area.

According to staff reports presented to city council, proton therapy gives patients a more concise radiation treatment.

"It allows the proton's dose of radiation to be controlled to the exact shape, depth and release energy needed within the body to treat tumors and other diseases, thereby minimizing the effect of radiation on surrounding tissue," the staff report said.

Economic development director Dana McDaniel told council about 600,000 people are diagnosed annually with tumors, and the facility could serve 1,500 to 3,000 people each year.

There are currently four proton therapy facilities in the U.S. Three more facilities are under construction, and one is currently being considered elsewhere, he said.

If approved by council, Ohio Proton Therapy LLC will build a 100,000-square-foot facility on about 30 acres of land, with about 62 additional acres surrounding it for additional development.

Daniel Slane, chairman of Ohio Proton Therapy, told council that the cancer treatment center would attract doctors' offices plus researchers and patients who "will come from all over the United States and stay for four to six weeks" in local hotels.

Although the economic development agreement calls for a 2017 opening, Slane said he hopes to have the facility open much sooner.

"I'm hoping we can get the equipment and get up and running in three years," he said. "It's an aggressive schedule."

McDaniel presented council with an agreement that included provisions involving land, construction of public improvements, income-tax performance incentive payments and a fiber-optic use agreement.

"Unlike other agreements I usually do, this is relatively complicated," McDaniel told council.

If Ohio Proton Therapy meets several deadlines concerning financing for construction, equipment and operating capital, the company will receive land the city will put in escrow.

The agreement also includes:

A deadline of Dec. 31, 2017, to complete construction and commence operations.

The city must make efforts to improve the U.S. Route 33, state Route 161 and Post Road interchange such as relocating Industrial Parkway and widening state Route 161. Financing for the improvement project was included in the 2006-2010 capital improvements program.

The establishment of a tax-increment financing district to help with infrastructure costs.

An annual payment by the city to Ohio Proton Therapy of 50 percent of income tax revenues generated by the facility, with an annual cap of $250,000 and a maximum payment of $2.5-million over the course of the agreement.

Dublin will provide two fibers to Ohio Proton Therapy to connect to the city's fiber-optic network.

The city will transfer to Ohio Proton Therapy property that currently holds a water tower when the city is no longer using it.

The economic development agreement also provides plans for almost 62 acres surrounding the proton therapy facility that would be used for other types of development. McDaniel called the therapy center an "anchor-type development for the Central Ohio Innovation Center."

The next reading of the agreement will go before council March 2.

jnoblit@thisweeknews.com