Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission officials said Monday that they will be making changes to the economic stimulus funding project list that they unveiled March 12.

Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission officials said Monday that they will be making changes to the economic stimulus funding project list that they unveiled March 12.

The revised project list is expected to be unveiled at 5 p.m. Monday, March 30.

MORPC held a 90-minute workshop Monday afternoon with about 100 representatives of various central Ohio governmental jurisdictions to explain the process they are using to distribute $28-million in transportation funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Commission representatives solicited input from members about the process, the March 12 list and concerns voiced about the commission's original plan for allocating the funds.

The original plan called for the $28-million to be split into three categories: $7-million for bike/pedestrian projects; $7-million for traditional projects (new capacity/long-term investment projects); and $14-million for so-called fix-it-first projects, $10-million of which would be designated for various central Ohio resurfacing projects.

When the original list was unveiled, Franklin County Commissioner Marilyn Brown questioned the inclusion of $2.4-million in studies in the total.

On Monday afternoon, Nick Gill, assistant director of MORPC's transportation department, said that $2.2-million of the funding to be used for the studies already had been removed and that the commission was open to member ideas for other changes. He said those changes could include revisions such as redistributing how the $28-million would be split up among the three categories.

That announcement sparked a variety of opinions from meeting attendees. Representatives of the city of Columbus argued that they deserved more of the resurfacing funds because the city has 46 percent of the region's lane miles to be resurfaced but is currently in line for only 29 percent of the resurfacing funding. Columbus representatives also said the city should receive more than the $6-million share of the $28-million total it is currently in line for because the city represents approximately 67 percent of the region's population.

Some in attendance questioned the allocation of $7-million for bike/pedestrian projects. One member called for that amount to be capped at 10 percent of the total, or $2.8-million, with the remainder of those funds to be redistributed into the other two categories.

Some questioned if $10-million was enough for regional resurfacing projects, while others contended that a greater economic impact would be realized if the traditional projects total was increased.

Attendees were invited to meet with MORPC staff members at the conclusion of Monday's meeting to talk about specific projects or to submit additional information about their projects.

MORPC will hold a special committee meeting at 3 p.m. March 30, followed by the scheduled 5 p.m. release of the revised project list.