Dublin City Council's finance committee stopped short of identifying which local groups will get a slice of $50,000 to help the city ring in its bicentennial celebration.

Dublin City Council's finance committee stopped short of identifying which local groups will get a slice of $50,000 to help the city ring in its bicentennial celebration.

Ten organizations requested anywhere from $1,350 to $300,000 in grants from the city's bed tax, $25,000 of which was carried over from last year specifically for the 200th birthday party. Events will be held next year.

Representatives from each group, some coming in with revised figures, addressed committee members Monday night. Finance chairman Mike Keenan said additional research will be done to see if there could be a combination of efforts from those organizations, as long as they stay within the budget.

"Some of this is considered seed money to get this thing off the ground," he said.

Keenan said committee members will make final recommendations at a special meeting, to be held before the July 1 city council meeting, when members are expected to vote on the matter.

The city had considered spending more on the celebration but the economy played a role in the funding level, Keenan said. However, city staff has been asked to incorporate bicentennial themes in major annual events, such as the Irish Festival and Fourth of July. Also, staff will look for private partnerships, he said.

In related news, the committee will apprise the rest of council on city finances on a quarterly basis. Keenan said, given the current economy, council needs to scrutinize the budget more closely -- and more often. Now, council is updated monthly on finances, but it does not carefully examine the budget beyond the normal planning process, Keenan said.

"This is a more structured, more proactive part of city council to take a really close look at this every three months," he said.

Keenan stressed that there is no cause for concern, although the city's first-quarter income tax receipts are down 3 percent from last year. He said the process for hiring employees who replace those who leave the city or are hired in other positions will tighten up in the future.

"We don't want to fall in the same situation many other public entities do," he said .