Cyclists, including three Dublin residents, will log more than 300 miles during the Pan Ohio Hope Ride that takes bike riders from Cleveland to Cincinnati.

Cyclists, including three Dublin residents, will log more than 300 miles during the Pan Ohio Hope Ride that takes bike riders from Cleveland to Cincinnati.

The four-day ride, organized by the American Cancer Society, is in its third year and benefits the society's Hope Lodges located in Cleveland and Cincinnati.

Dublin resident Dennis Hoffer helped start the ride three years ago after he found out his son-in-law had three types of cancer.

"I thought, 'How does he have cancer? He's only 25.' I wanted to do something," Hoffer said.

Hoffer, an avid cyclist, was set up with someone else who was trying to start a cycling fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, and the event fell into place.

The beneficiary of the ride was obvious to Hoffer, who speaks highly of the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge.

"You want to contribute, but you want to know where (the money is) going. I know it's going to housing for people undergoing cancer treatment," he said. "When you hear these stories, it's pretty emotional."

Cyclists must pay a $150 registration fee to participate in the ride, and they also do additional fundraising. According to the event's Web site, panohiohoperide.org, more than $200,000 had been raised as of last week.

Dublin resident Clay Filson is riding in the Hope Ride for the first time. He said the ride starts about a mile away from where his father, who died of cancer, lived.

Filson, who has cycled across Iowa, said he started cycling with his father.

"I started riding when I was younger. My dad was a very active cyclist in the 60s when it probably wasn't as common place," he said. "We started doing it a lot back then. It was a great way for us to spend time together."

The ride will cover 75 miles in its first day from Cleveland to Wooster and 95 miles the second day when cyclists will come to Columbus. The 70-mile trek on the third day takes cyclists to Springfield. On the fourth day, riders will go 80 miles to Cincinnati.

Colin Scott, also of Dublin, rode one day of the Pan Ohio Hope Ride last year, but is going for all four days this year. He said trying the whole event might leave him a little sore, but he believes it's worth it.

"One thing that occurred to me is that I got involved in this because of a colleague in the office, but when I stop to think about it, I've lost friends and family (to cancer) in the past," he said. "We should all ride, keeping those people in mind."

Filson also said he'll use people in his life to push him during the ride.

"My brother-in-law has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer at 44. The more you open your eye to this, cancer is all around you," he said. "There's so much inspiration from people around me that have experienced a lot more than I have. When I get tired, hopefully I'll think about them and they'll help push me up the hill."

The Pan Ohio Hope Ride begins Thursday in Cleveland and ends in Cincinnati on Sunday. Cyclists will spend the night at Otterbein College in Westerville on Friday and make a stop at the Field of Corn in Dublin from 8 to 9 a.m. Saturday.

For more information or to contribute to the ride, go to panohiohoperide.org.