The director of a recent study on the impact of texting while driving stated it should never be done because of how dangerous it is. The study found drivers were 23 times more likely to crash if they texted while they drove, according to Tom Dingus, director of the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute.

The director of a recent study on the impact of texting while driving stated it should never be done because of how dangerous it is. The study found drivers were 23 times more likely to crash if they texted while they drove, according to Tom Dingus, director of the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute.

As the Ohio General Assembly considers legislation that would make the specific act of texting while driving illegal, Dublin police encourage motorists to focus their attention on driving and save all other activities for either before or after they are in their vehicles.

In fact, did you know the city of Dublin has a law that allows officers to stop and cite those who drive while distracted? It's called "full time and attention" and authorizes a police officer to ticket a driver if the officer believes a motorist is driving while distracted.

The law covers anything a driver might be doing other than focusing all of their attention on operating the vehicle. This includes listening to an iPod with earphones, putting on make-up, reading and, of course, texting on a cell phone.

It takes less than a second for a motor vehicle to become a lethal weapon. About 30 percent of all accidents nationwide can be attributed to driver distraction, according to research by the federal government. Put another way, if all of us drove without doing anything to distract us, we could eliminate roughly one of every three accidents.

Furthermore, a study by the Insurance Information Institute shows drivers using their cell phones are four times as likely to be in an accident, a rate equal to someone driving at or above the legal limit for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Here are some simple but effective things each of us can do while driving to make the roads safer for everyone:

Do not use your cell phone while driving; this includes voice as well as text conversations.

If you must use your cell phone while in your vehicle, pull into a parking lot -- do not simply pull your vehicle over to the side of the road as this can be dangerous.

If you are listening to music or the radio, do not listen through earphones and keep the volume at a level where you can hear the sirens of emergency vehicles.

Do not eat or drink while driving.

Do not groom yourself in your vehicle.

Do not read while driving; pull into a parking lot if you need to use a map or GPS device for directions.

Mike Epperson is Dublin police chief.

Mike Epperson