Despite the high winds on Monday, a crane arrived at the Dublin Arts Council to set up the group's latest public art project: Titration3: Rock, Paper, Sculpture.

Despite the high winds on Monday, a crane arrived at the Dublin Arts Council to set up the group's latest public art project: Titration3: Rock, Paper, Sculpture.

The work by Boston sculptor Joseph Wheelwright includes three sculptures placed around the grounds of the Dublin Arts Council at 7125 Riverside Drive.

Two of the taller pieces of art are made from trees and the third is a squat, carved stone.

The tallest of the tree sculptures, "Yellow Birch," stands 17 feet tall. The other tree sculpture, "Jaunty Hornbeam," is a bronzed hornbeam tree that is taller than the average person.

Wheelwright said he turns the trees upside down for his sculptures, using the limbs for legs and arms, the trunk for the body and the roots for the head.

"Sanguine Standing Stone" is the shortest of the new sculptures on the arts council's grounds, but weighs in at 1.5 tons.

Wheelwright, who said he's always enjoyed nature, began his sculpting and carving on bones, but moved to rocks and trees in adulthood.

According to the artist, both mediums are not unlike humans; rocks are "stubborn" and trees reach for water and sun.

"The stones have been through a terrific cerebral journey," he said. "They gradually formed themselves into entities. They're like us: stubborn and cerebral."

The arts council will open the exhibit on Sunday with an artist reception from 1 to 3 p.m.

The on-loan exhibition will be on view for one year. Visitors will get a chance to decide which of the three pieces to keep through in-person and online voting from Oct. 4 to Nov. 1.

It is the art council's voting process and community involvement that pulled in some of the funding for the project.

The project is funded through the Ohio Arts Council, Dublin's bed tax and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The "Challenge America: Reaching Every Community" grant came from the National Endowment for the Arts and was a surprise for the arts council.

"They called and said they saw some work, Titration2, I think, online and they really liked the voting process," said arts council executive director David Guion. "They said they really wanted us to apply. It is very unprecedented to be asked to apply."

According to Guion, grants given out from the National Endowment for the Arts are "very competitive."

"They're encouraging us to come back and do it again," he said. "When you receive a National Endowment for the Arts grant it's a seal of approval that opens the doors (for other grants.)"

This project is the third in the Titration series that began in 2007. Guion said this likely will be the last in the Titration series. For more information or to vote on a piece of art in Titration3: Rock, Paper, Scuplture, go online to dublinarts.org.