A texting ban is on the radar of Dublin City Council, but with legislation being drafted by state lawmakers, council could take a wait-and-see approach.

A texting ban is on the radar of Dublin City Council, but with legislation being drafted by state lawmakers, council could take a wait-and-see approach.

A texting ban within the city was discussed last week. Mayor Marilee Chinnici-Zuercher said council waited to draft legislation until the matter was looked into and an educational campaign was begun.

Dublin police Chief Mike Epperson told council members the educational campaign is so far focusing on the high schools.

"We're visiting the high schools and we have the street-safe program," he said. "We had an insurance company drive through the cones while texting."

The police department has also been showing high school students a video on a teen who survived an accident that occurred while texting. "That reaches them," Epperson told council members.

Staff is looking into other texting legislation around central Ohio and the state, but is holding out because of pending legislation at the state level, Epperson said.

Council member Amy Salay wondered if the state legislation covered only texting because there are "several dangerous things you can do behind the wheel" of a car.

Epperson said legislation he saw included only texting, but Dublin has a law on the books that can net distracted drivers.

"We have used it to cite people for all sorts of things," he said. "(People are) reaching for food, reaching back to correct a child."

The negative thing about the full-attention law is that it is often cited after an accident, he said.

Council members agreed to keep an eye on state legislation concerning texting.

In other council news:

The replacement of two shelters in the eastern part of Coffman Park was approved. Fred Hahn, director of parks and open space, said the city procured two shelter kits for $88,549. The city awarded a contract to Janco LLC for $69,350 to construct replacement shelters. Council named its newest park Smiley Park. Dublin acquired the 1.9-acre park at the Blazer office campus from Dr. Samuel Smiley in 2002. The city recently developed the land into a park and voted unanimously last week to name it after the donor.