While school children in Dublin have gotten extra days off, the snowfall that is pushing central Ohio toward the snowiest February on the books has meant extra work for some city of Dublin employees.

While school children in Dublin have gotten extra days off, the snowfall that is pushing central Ohio toward the snowiest February on the books has meant extra work for some city of Dublin employees.

The snow also has kept city vehicles on the move. Dublin uses 22 large trucks for snow removal, in addition to four tractors that remove snow from smaller areas where maneuvering is essential.

"We've been running 12-hour shifts and we have approximately 30 people per shift," said streets and utilities director Ron Burns.

"Once the snow stops, it takes approximately 12 hours for every three inches of snow that we have received to clear the city," he said.

He didn't know how much money the city has spent as a result of the three recent snowstorms, because all of the financial figures haven't been calculated.

The cost to Dublin City Schools has been four of its five calamity days. Any days missed in excess of five would result in makeup days at the end of the school year.

Burns said the city has used 8,000 tons of salt to keep roads clear this winter, including 2,500 tons during the last few weeks.

"We went through the state of Ohio with the cooperative purchasing program to bid salt and we reserved 7,200 tons of regular salt and 2,000 tons of enhanced salt," Burns said.

Recently, the city has been utilizing the enhanced salt that is treated with chemicals such as calcium to make it more effective in below-freezing temperatures, Burns said.

The city already has exhausted the salt it initially ordered, but officials try to keep salt barns full in case of emergency.

"We have the ability to keep about 4,000 tons in inventory, so we've ordered salt several times," he said. "We try to keep the salt barns full."

After Dublin's streets are cleared, the inevitable thawing and freezing is apt to cause potholes around the city. Burns said residents can report potholes by calling the streets and utilities office at (614) 410-4750 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.