Dublin residents can meet Rhode Island artist Brower Hatcher next week and provide feedback on the bicentennial public artwork that he has designed for the historic Karrer Barn property.

Dublin residents can meet Rhode Island artist Brower Hatcher next week and provide feedback on the bicentennial public artwork that he has designed for the historic Karrer Barn property.

The Monday, May 3, meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the Dublin Community Recreation Center, 5600 Post Road.

Residents will learn about the artwork that Hatcher said was inspired by George Karrer's blacksmith shop that stood on the site decades ago. As it currently stands, the artwork is to include a limestone foundation with iron rods forming the framework of a structure that will be 13 square feet and 16 feet tall, with items from a blacksmith shop inside.

In roundtable discussions, residents will have the chance to comment on the color, the materials and the size of the artwork, along with where it should be installed at the site.

Sara Ott, senior project manager for the city, said residents can visit the Karrer Barn property, 225 S. High St. in Historic Dublin, before the meeting with Hatcher to see the "footprint" of the art.

"We marked out its footprint and where the corners are," she said last week, adding that the city will look into ways to mark the artwork's expected height.

The selection process for the artwork honoring Dublin's 2010 bicentennial started last year. The Karrer Barn property was chosen as the site by the Dublin Arts Council last August.

A call for artists yielded more than 100 applicants, and three finalists made presentations in February.

Many residents voiced concerns on the appropriateness of the site after city council selected Hatcher's vision for the blacksmith shop and approved a $150,000 contract with the artist in a 5-2 vote in late February.

Although the site is not up for discussion at next week's meeting, the specific location of the artwork at the site is fair game. Ott said anyone not able to attend the meeting can leave comments on the city's Web site, Dublin.oh. us.

While city officials have hoped the artwork would be installed during the bicentennial year, the timeline hasn't been set.

Feedback from residents will affect the installation date, Ott said.

"Brower will take the input that he gains from his visit and contemplate any proposed modifications to the design," she said. "He will submit (those plans) for technical review by staff."

Staff will make sure the plans comply with safety and building codes, but the artwork will not need further approval from any city commissions.

"(The timeline) will depend on the amount of modifications that might occur," Ott said. "He will have a better idea of the timeline after he gets comments."