The Boy Scouts of America officially turned 100 in February, but the organization is spending the entire year celebrating the milestone.

The Boy Scouts of America officially turned 100 in February, but the organization is spending the entire year celebrating the milestone.

Like other central Ohio communities, Dublin held its own celebration last week with a tree planting in Coffman Park.

The event gave some former Scouts a chance to reflect on their experiences with the organization.

Mayor Tim Lecklider recalled reaching the highest rank of scouting.

"I joined when I was 11 years old," he said. "Then I was a Scout into the early '70s in Kettering. I was an Eagle Scout."

Council member Richard Gerber said he spent time in the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts.

"I really enjoyed it, but there was a conflict between sports and Scouts," he said, adding that he quit after a few years as a Boy Scout.

He did learn some of the Boy Scouts "core values" such as "honesty, good deeds and being kind to people," Gerber said.

Steve Sova, director of accounting and auditing for the city, said his initial time with the Scouts exposed him to the outdoors.

"Some of the things we did as a troop I did for the first time, like canoeing and camping," he said. "I still enjoy doing those things now."

Sova said he learned about teamwork along with how important it is to follow the Boy Scouts oath.

According to the Web site of the Boy Scouts of America, the oath is: "On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight."

Scout law is: "A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent."

"I think anybody that stays with the Scouts, (the oath) kind of sticks with you," Sova said.

Lecklider remembered several of the values he learned, including teamwork, leadership discipline, confidence, getting along with others and organization.

"I really value my time in the Scouts," he said.

Boy Scout Mikey Raabe, a student at Davis Middle School, attended the tree planting to represent Troop 185.

"I liked Cub Scouts. I really like camping," he said. "My goal is to become an Eagle Scout."

Raabe, who also is a den chief for his younger brother Jackson's troop, said he was surprised the Boy Scouts are celebrating 100 years.

"I'm surprised it's survived," he said.

His father, Kevin Raabe, isn't quite as surprised.

"It's an amazing organization that helped make great leaders for this country," he said.