The Win-Win annexation agreement with Columbus City Schools is important to Dublin schools and the community overall, and the district will continue to participate in the 24-year-old pact.

The Win-Win annexation agreement with Columbus City Schools is important to Dublin schools and the community overall, and the district will continue to participate in the 24-year-old pact.

Dublin Superintendent David Axner told school board members at their meeting Monday night that issues can arise every six years when the agreement comes up for renewal. Districts have until May 31 to seek removal from the agreement. Once that time period passes, the pact automatically is renewed for another six years. Reynoldsburg opted out of the agreement in 1998, the only district to do so.

Since 1986, Win-Win has kept suburban areas annexed into Columbus in the school districts in which they originated.

Last week, some Columbus school board members brought up the issue as to whether Win-Win is still a good deal for Columbus. However, Axner told Dublin board members that he is unaware of any districts that want to pull out of the agreement. But news media attention about Columbus resulted in numerous e-mails and calls in the past week from concerned parents and the public to Dublin school officials about Win-Win.

"I guess clearly, I need to say this personally, we will as administrative staff and the board of education do everything in our power to protect the boundaries of the district," Axner said. "It's about the students and what's best for them. It's our plan to always keep these Dublin City Schools students."

A little over 4,000 students live in Columbus but are in the Dublin school district, Axner said after Monday's meeting. Dublin schools pay Columbus schools about $1-million a year as part of the Win-Win agreement. In the area shared by Dublin and Columbus, the Dublin school district collects about $36-million in property taxes annually, Axner said.

If anything would happen involving the Win-Win agreement, the state board of education would have final say on any attempts to change school-district boundaries, the superintendent said.

While Dublin board members made no collective comments Monday night about Win-Win, member Stu Harris said he was happy Axner discussed the agreement.

"I want to add my voice and my unreserved support for Win-Win," Harris said. "We look to support our students and families."

In another matter Monday night, the board approved hiring retiring Coffman High School teacher Mary Ann Grimes as the district's new community education director. She was awarded a one-year contract, effective Aug. 1, that pays $28,000.

Grimes, a physical education teacher and coach, has taught in Dublin for 13 years and has been a teacher for 33 years. Her retirement is effective May 31 and she will work under a supplemental contract between June 1 and Aug. 1.

Axner said after the meeting that Grimes will coordinate various adult and after-school education programs, including the district's drivers education program.

The school board also heard updates involving several new elective courses for next school year. Fourteen new courses, including ACT/SAT preparation and literacy skills, will be offered in high school language arts. A new high school anatomy and physiology course also will be offered.

The board previously approved the ACT/SAT and anatomy and physiology courses and now must approve the course content for both of them. Further board action on those two courses, as well as the others, is expected later this spring.