Despite objections from leaders of Shawnee Hills, Dublin City Council voted unanimously Monday to construct a 500,000-gallon, 200-foot water tower near the city's border with the village.

Despite objections from leaders of Shawnee Hills, Dublin City Council voted unanimously Monday to construct a 500,000-gallon, 200-foot water tower near the city's border with the village.

Mayor Pat Monahan and other Shawnee Hills council members attended the Dublin council meeting and asked the city to move the water tower south of the selected site, which is near the Bogey Inn.

Earlier this month, city engineer Paul Hammersmith told council members that Monahan had requested a meeting on the potential location.

Dublin researched possible sites for the water tower and began taking comments from the public in January. City staff recommended a four-acre site in a Memorial Tournament parking lot off Dublin Road.

"The site is much worse than anticipated," Monahan said at Monday night's meeting. "It's 100 feet off our border. Why have a water tower we're not being served by?"

Monahan asked council members to consider moving the water tower 500 feet south. Building it so close to Shawnee Hills would be a "slap in the face," he said.

The water tower would ruin the landscape of Shawnee Hills, he said.

Dublin engineering manager Barbara Cox said the city looked at a location suggested by Shawnee Hills, but the landowner, the Muirfield Village Golf Club, was unwilling to sell that location. Hammersmith said there also were worries of a sinkhole in that area.

Council member Michael Keenan apologized for poor communication with Shawnee Hills, but said the locations of public facilities are often a "contentious" subject.

Council member John Reiner said the location was "not a political decision" and "was turned over to the engineers to best decide." The councilman moved to locate the water tower at the selected site and council unanimously agreed.

The water tower is estimated to cost about $2.6-million, which does not include the cost of land, which will be purchased from the Muirfield Village Golf Club.

In other news, council heard the first reading of two economic development agreements.

If approved by council, Dublin would offer Quality Supply Chain Co-op a $5,000 location grant and a four-year, 20-percent performance incentive on withholdings collected, capped at $137,500. The city expects to collect $457,000 in income-tax withholdings.

In return, the company must execute a five-year lease in Dublin, retain its 20 employees and add 24 more during the course of the agreement.

The state also has offered Quality Supply Chain Co-op a seven-year, 50-percent job creation tax credit and a $647,415 grant.

Economic development administrator Colleen Gilger said the company is currently operating as a standalone business at the Wendy's corporate headquarters. Quality Supply Chain Co-op is the exclusive purchasing agent of food and packaging items for more than 6,000 Wendy's franchises, the city said.

Inventrio, a software development company, could be offered a three-year, 10-percent performance incentive on income-tax withholdings, which would be capped at $22,500 for signing a five-year lease and locating its headquarters in Dublin. The company also must add 20 employees over the term of the agreement.

According to the staff report, Dublin expects to pay Inventrio $12,000 in incentives and net $108,000 in income-tax withholdings during the agreement.

Council will hear the final readings of both economic development agreements on June 14.