Franklin County Public Health sprayed for mosquitoes a week after a trap in northeast Dublin tested positive for West Nile virus.

Franklin County Public Health sprayed for mosquitoes a week after a trap in northeast Dublin tested positive for West Nile virus.

According to Mitzi Kline, director of communications at Franklin County Public Health, the finding was not a surprise.

"We're at peak time right now," she said. "This is not unexpected."

August tends to yield a high number of mosquitoes, Kline said, and 57 traps in Franklin County have tested positive for West Nile virus so far.

"It is not uncommon to find positive West Nile virus in traps this time of year in central Ohio," streets and utilities director Ron Burns said in a news release. "The main thing residents should do is protect themselves by wearing insect repellent containing DEET and stay indoors at dawn and dusk, when mosquitoes are most active."

The trap in northeast Dublin was the only one in the city to test positive for West Nile virus, Kline said, and Franklin County Public Health has sprayed several times this summer in Dublin because of high numbers of mosquitoes.

West Nile virus is a disease that can be transmitted to people from the bite of an infected mosquito. According to Franklin County Public Health, the virus "attacks the central nervous system, causing symptoms ranging from fever and headaches to encephalitis, which can be fatal."

The risk of catching West Nile virus, however, is low. Kline said the last reported case of West Nile virus in a Franklin County resident was in 2006.

"In 1999, there was a huge number of cases all over the country, but human cases have really gone down," she said. As of Aug. 30, two human cases in Ohio had been reported, but not in central Ohio.

Kline said people should wear insect repellant when outdoors, though.

Traps will continue to be tested through mid-September, Kline said, but mosquitoes shouldn't be a problem much longer.

"As the weather starts to cool down, the mosquito population goes down," she said.

For more information or maps of areas to be sprayed for mosquitoes, look online at myfcph.org.

Residents should call (614) 525-2483 or go on myfcph.org to report problems.