A proposed Wright-Holder Park would highlight the history of the land, show off Wright's Run and educate visitors on native American mounds, according to a master park plan submitted to Dublin City Council last week.

A proposed Wright-Holder Park would highlight the history of the land, show off Wright's Run and educate visitors on native American mounds, according to a master park plan submitted to Dublin City Council last week.

The proposal outlines plans for 47 acres between Interstate 270, Riverside Drive and Bright Road, although not all land will be devoted to the park nor is it all owned by Dublin yet.

According to parks and open space director Fred Hahn, the city currently owns about 21 acres on the east side of the property that backs up to homes on Grandee Cliffs Drive.

"The city currently owns 21.4 acres. Our study area was much larger than that," he said. "The rationale behind that is we were reflecting what had been shown in the 2007 community plan."

Plans are to use the southern portion of the property, which will eventually back up to the eighth and final phase of the Emerald Parkway extension, for 70,000 feet of office development.

"When the city first purchased the property we knew it would have areas along Emerald Parkway phase eight," Hahn said. "When it does exist, the frontage along Emerald Parkway could be developed into commercial."

Wright's Run, which runs east to west on the 47 acres, would act as the dividing line, with office development to the south and the park to the north.

The farm has long been an item of interest for Dublin as it holds "prehistoric mounds" that consist of "three geometric earthworks and five burial mounds and are considered to belong to the Middle Woodland period dating to 200 B.C.- A.D. 400," the park proposal states.

Excavations at the site performed in 1922 and 1961 revealed chipped stone flakes, a fireplace and human bones.

"Due to disturbance by farming activities, several of the mounds are difficult to see with the untrained eye. However, because of their excellent condition below plow depth and significance as one of the few remaining prehistoric community centers in the state, this site has great interpretive and archaeological opportunities," the park plan said.

Plans are to emphasize the history of the site and its connection to native and early Americans.

Recommendations are to renovate a house on the land that was originally built in 1820 for use as a visitor's center.

While the mounds have been mostly leveled for farming, the plans are to use different grasses to show where the mounds were.

A demonstration earthwork is also anticipated to "illustrate to visitors what a typical Hopewell earthwork may have looked like in its original condition," the plan states. The earthwork will include a fire pit and a cut-away in the mound to show how the mound was constructed and what is inside.

A demonstration garden will be used to give park visitors insight on native- and early-American agriculture.

Other park features proposed include a walkway over Wright's Run, trails, picnic areas and restored Ferris Cemetery.

Funding for the plan was included in the 2012 budget and this year's five-year Capital Improvement Plan has $510,000 in funding for construction programmed in 2013. The entire park is expected to cost about $2 million.

Council members vote on the CIP each year, so funding for the park could change.

Hahn said the city plans to work on park features on the city-owned land, which includes the Holder house.

"If in the foreseeable time we only have the 21 acres, its still a legitimate park," he said. "Park development is not dependent on land acquisition."

It could be contingent on the final phase of the Emerald Parkway extension, though.

"One of the really big ifs in all this is when Emerald Parkway will be constructed. The front door to the park is Emerald Parkway-to-be," Hahn said. "We'll do improvements to the park, but may not be able to open it right away. It's unusual for us to have a park development contingent upon road development. Roads always come first."

Hahn expects to do a park-plan presentation for council members sometime in April.

"We'll present the master plan and open it to council for input," he said.