If the Dublin Board of Education decides to go on the November ballot with a bond issue, the proposal will look different than the one turned down by voters last November.

If the Dublin Board of Education decides to go on the November ballot with a bond issue, the proposal will look different than the one turned down by voters last November.

School board members last week looked at options for capital improvements around the district that will help craft a possible bond issue (see related story above).

While the bond issue rejected by voters last November outlined $25 million in projects around the district, the new options being mulled over by board members range from $9.9 million to $17.7 million.

"We're trying to put a package together that makes the most sense," Superintendent David Axner said.

The trouble is in planning for needs around the district while trying to predict future funding, he said, noting that funding from tangible personal property taxes is expected to decline further, along with state foundation money.

"That money is being used to balance the state budget and that's not going to come back," Axner said.

Another problem is maintaining the high quality expected in the district with less funding, he added.

The previous $25-million bond issue focused on maintenance around the district.

Maintenance such as concrete repairs and replacement, asphalt resurfacing, roofing and painting accounted for about $9.8 million of the previous bond issue.

The bond issue defeated last November also would have funded $4.3 million in construction at Deer Run and Glacier Ridge elementary schools. Deer Run was slated to get seven new classrooms and Glacier Ridge four.

Planned equipment purchases included buses, vans, mowers, copiers and snow-removal vehicles for $5.4 million.

Also included in the 2011 bond issue was $5.5 million for computer replacement, new technology, enhanced wireless coverage and other improvements.

Axner said the $25-million bond issue likely failed because of bad timing and a request that was too high.

"We think we'll be in much safer territory as we go back this year," he said.

Differences in the new options for capital improvements include the elimination of four new classrooms at Glacier Ridge Elementary School, repairing roofs instead of replacing them, reducing the replacement of doors and windows, repairing tracks and tennis courts instead of resurfacing and reducing the repair of grounds, district business affairs director Annette Morud said.

The district also will work to repair and maintain equipment instead of replacing it.

Board members are expected to choose options for a possible fall bond issue at the next meeting on April 25.

Options for a possible operating levy are expected to follow in May.