If the joint bond issue and operating levy fails in November, $10 million to $12 million will have to be cut from Dublin City School's budget, although where the money will come from is still being worked out.

If the joint bond issue and operating levy fails in November, $10 million to $12 million will have to be cut from Dublin City School's budget, although where the money will come from is still being worked out.

Dublin City School District Superintendent David Axner this week outlined a few areas that would be impacted by $10 to $12 million in cuts should the combined 6.94-mill issue be rejected by voters this fall.

A complete list of cuts is expected to go to board of education members at the Sept. 10 meeting and a resolution about the cuts is slated to be voted on Sept. 24.

After voters rejected a combined 7.2-mill operating levy and $25-million bond issue last fall the district worked to trim more than $7 million from its budget.

The 6.94-mill issue on the ballot for Dublin City Schools this fall includes a 6.4-mill operating levy and $15.8 million bond issue.

If approved by voters, the tax issue would cost an additional $213 per $100,000 home value each year.

After cutting $7.1 million from the district budget, Axner said another $10 to $12 million in reductions would have a "substantial" affect on staffing.

The cuts already made impacted 120 staffing positions and Axner said additional cuts would affect a large number of teachers and support staff across the board.

"This becomes more challenging as you get higher (numbers)," he said.

Administration in the central office would take a hit, passing more work onto school buildings, Axner said, and assistant principal positions would be impacted.

More electives would be eliminated, paring down offerings to state-required classes.

Programs including Advanced Placement, or AP, and International Baccalaureate, or IB, would be reduced substantially.

"Those are premiere programs, but are not cheap to run," Axner said.

More students would also be in each class.

"We would be coming to you to raise the caps (on class size)," Axner told board members.

The district already increased class sizes at the elementary school level by one or two students during the last round of cuts.

The failure of the Nov. 6 levy and bond issue would also affect sports.

Axner said rather than looking at coaching positions, entire programs such as seventh- and eighth-grade sports programs and junior varsity could be cut.

Pay-to-participate costs could also be increased to at least $400 or $500 for the first sport with no family caps, he said.

If the November tax issue fails, high school busing would be on the chopping block, Axner said.

"Most likely the entire high school busing schedule would be eliminated," he said. "It's not state mandated."

Axner and Deputy Superintendent Michael Trego have been looking at cuts and will continue to do so until the Sept. 10 board meeting when a list of reductions will be presented to board members.

"It's an ongoing discussion," Axner said. "We're still pricing things."

If the levy does fail, Axner said the district will try to make whatever cuts possible after Nov. 6.

Staff layoffs would be announced in the spring and the full affect of the cuts would be felt the 2013-14 school year.