Dublin Villager

Board to consider global education possibilities

Students could work toward a graduation cord and class credit through travel

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Dublin City School students could soon earn credit for travel.

Dublin Board of Education members last week got an update on global education possibilities from Eydie Schilling, director of learning and teaching for the district.

"Now we're getting to the point where a student can earn a cord at graduation on international travel and get class credit," Superintendent David Axner said, adding that when the program is put together it will need the board's approval before it can be used by students.

According to Schilling, she's been working with other districts around central Ohio on adding international travel to education possibilities. New Albany, Westerville, South-Western and Columbus City Schools are among the districts Schilling is working with for the global scholars program.

Dublin has been looking at graduation criteria and using a global competence matrix developed by EdSteps, a national organization led by the Council of Chief State School Officers.

Education First, a company that offers educational travel for students, has a variety of trips that relate to different curriculum, Schilling said. The company has English schools across the country and world, which would mean support in most cities for teachers and students on trips.

For the program, Schilling said, students could travel and collect data on their trip.

According to Education First's website, students can learn about subjects including history, culture, politics, ecology and literature by visiting historical locations, cities and museums.

The program is still being created, so Schilling was unable to provide details on locations or curriculum included.

Work could progress fast enough to begin offering the new program next fall, though, she said.

Axner said scholarships would be available so some students would not be left out.

Establishing a program could also help students save for the program, Schilling said.

"If they learn about it in middle school, families would have time to save," she said.

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