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Ohio Historical Society

Display meant to evoke images of change

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Among the attractions on display in Transformation is this white silk taffeta dress worn by Jacqueline "Jackie" Mayer, a Sandusky native who was crowned Miss America in 1962. Part of the exhibit includes a video loop of the original broadcast of the pageant, which was seen in 20 million households that year. Mayer, who's 71, still lives in Sandusky.
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The Ohio Historical Society has threaded together an exhibit with no unifying theme, instead allowing audiences to let their imaginations interpret the artifacts.

Transformation, which runs through March 30 at the facility, 800 E. 17th Ave., is a five-piece display meant to show how even the smallest objects -- some uplifting and others with darker implications -- can bring about historic revolution.

"Transformation showcases objects that represent powerful moments of change in history, ones that have personal, national and global significance," said Shannon Thomas, communications manager for the historical society.

"This exhibit presents one of the most fundamental aspects of the human experience -- change -- and asks visitors to engage with all the various forms that change can take."

Take, for example, the display on Buttons, which was believed to the last wild passenger pigeon on earth.

Press Southworth, a 14-year-old boy in Pike County, used a shotgun in 1900 to kill the bird.

An amateur taxidermist stuffed the bird and used buttons to replace the bird's eyes, hence the name. Wild passenger pigeons, once thought to be infinite in abundance, are now extinct.

Among the attractions is a piece on Jacqueline "Jackie" Mayer, a Sandusky native who was crowned Miss America in 1962.

Part of the exhibit is a video loop of the original broadcast of the pageant, which was seen in 20 million households that year. Also displayed is her crown and the white silk taffeta dress she wore at the event.

Mayer, who's 71, still lives in Sandusky.

The historical society is also displaying Amunet, a 2,000-year-old female mummy that was donated to the historical society in 1926 by Dr. J. Morton Howell, the first ambassador to Egypt under President Warren G. Harding, an Ohioan.

The exhibit also includes the coffin of Neskhonspakhered, who was originally buried in the casket. Nobody knows what happened to the body of of Neskhonspakhered.

Transformation additionally presents segments of the hanging rope used to execute four conspirators in the Lincoln assassination and a Max Factor vaudeville makeup kit from the 1920s.

Admission to the historical society is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors $5 for children 6 to 12 years old.Children 5 and younger will be admitted for free.

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