Wearing many hats over the years at the Greek Festival, Nick and Dino Soulas are now where they're most comfortable: in the kitchen.

Wearing many hats over the years at the Greek Festival, Nick and Dino Soulas are now where they're most comfortable: in the kitchen.

The two brothers - Nick of Dublin and Dino of Blacklick - are among dozens of volunteers who layer the moussaka, hand-roll the dolmathes and form the spanakopita into little triangles for the festival, to be held this weekend at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Cathedral.

They have a 10-year history with the event, which is ringing in its 36th year. They follow time-honored recipes for the food, which is one of the main attractions each year.

"We prepare and serve more food over four days than many restaurants do in a year," said Stacey Stathulis, marketing and public relations chairman for the event. "That's due to Nick and Dino and the kitchen crew they lead. It takes a lot of people and a lot of hands to run the festival kitchen and keep the food coming at a steady pace for our patrons."

Long lines are the norm for the Greek meals, which are served in the church, 555 N. High St. Other midway fare - gyros and such - is available at various tents outside.

"There's no better feeling than when the line goes out the door no matter what the weather is like," Dino Soulas said.

The brothers are no strangers to food service. Dino is the president of Jolly Pirate Donuts, which was founded in central Ohio by father Nick Soulas Sr. Nick Jr., meanwhile, learned to cook from his late father-in-law Pete Strangas, who owned the Red Ox, which closed in the early 1980s.

Festival organizers expect to draw 35,000 people at the three-day event, which starts Friday. The event is the biggest fundraiser for the church each year. Part of the challenge is to keep the food affordable. The good news is, attendance grows each year, Nick said.

"While making money is important, showing our community is just as important," he added.

Admission for the festival is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, free for children 12 and younger. Dancing and music also are part of the festival.

gseman@thisweeknews.com

If you go

Location: Annunciation Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 555 N. High St., Short North

Hours: 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday, noon to midnight Sunday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday

Admission: $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, free for children 12 and younger