The Gahanna-Jefferson Education Foundation recently announced its list of fall grant recipients, funding projects ranging form increasing the selection of nonfiction books to a school-to-work transition program for special-needs students.

The Gahanna-Jefferson Education Foundation recently announced its list of fall grant recipients, funding projects ranging form increasing the selection of nonfiction books to a school-to-work transition program for special-needs students.

Twenty mini-grants for a total of $5,805 and 19 excellence grants totaling $28,668 were funded, said Dale Foor, district director of community affairs.

"We had lot more requests than we did money," Foor said. He said the grants process allows staff members to make presentations for grant requests.

"Special education picked up a number of grants that we couldn't fund," Foor said.

Over the last four years, the Gahanna-Jefferson Education Foundation has awarded 230 grants for a total of more than $200,000.

Lincoln Elementary School requested $300 to purchase nonfiction books for the learning-disabled room. The request was funded by special-needs grants.

"We have children who have special needs, learning disabilities, attention difficulty, cognitive delays," said teacher Joyce Kiourtis, and teachers wanted more money for nonfiction books. As children get older, they are required to read more nonfiction, she said, and the grant will help Lincoln to keep up with new reading trends.

Hallie Sisko, intervention specialist at Gahanna Lincoln High School, requested $300 to purchase materials to support transition-to-work projects.

"It is a set of books and materials for students who range in age from 14 to 22," she said. "What the books are going to do is help prepare them to go from high school to the real world, give them some idea how the real world works, how to interview."

Sisko is in her eighth year of working with cognitively delayed students at GLHS.

Goshen Lane teacher Debbie Russell requested $300 to purchase take-home books for students. She said she has applied and been awarded the grant for several years.

The books support at-risk students, particularly those learning English. The idea was to concentrate on social studies and science, Russell said.

Middle School East teacher Kate Lewicki applied for a $305 grant to purchase materials to support improvement in geometry.

"We got a grant to purchase these things called pattern blocks," she said. "We got enough for both eighth-grade teachers and the rest of the teachersÉ"

Teachers wanted the blocks for a geometry design project, Lewicki said. The patterns will help students see how geometry is connected to real life, she said.

tstubbs@thisweeknews.com