Gahanna City Council will give first readings next week to two pieces of legislation intended to protect the safety of city residents.

Gahanna City Council will give first readings next week to two pieces of legislation intended to protect the safety of city residents.

The first seeks to upgrade three of the city's six tornado sirens.

James Williams, director of Gahanna's emergency management department, told council's finance committee Sept. 27 that he has been told by the sirens' manufacturer that replacement parts for the sirens are no longer available.

Two of the city's sirens already have been upgraded to a newer model and one is in the process of being replaced.

The siren manufacturer, Williams said, is offering to upgrade the three remaining sirens for a total of $15,000. Should the city wait and later have to replace a broken siren, the cost would be about $20,000 each, he said.

The sirens to be upgraded are about 10 to 12 years old; however, it is difficult to predict how long one would last, Williams said. The siren outside city hall has been replaced three times in 10 years, and the one currently being upgraded was installed in the 1960s and was the oldest in Franklin County, he said.

"It's like your car," Williams said. "A car may run for eight years with nothing wrong, and the next day it may quit on you. It's just the way they are."

Another item to be introduced by council next week is renewal of the city's contract for services with the Franklin County Board of Health.

In 2011, the cost of the contract will be $5.73 for each resident, city service director Terry Emery said. That is the same cost per capita as this year, but the total will increase slightly, to about $197,000, because of the growth in the city's population, he said.

He said that price does not include the cost of mosquito control, which he expects to "go up dramatically" next year.

In 2009, the city paid 19 cents per capita for mosquito control. This year, the city paid 29 cents per capita, or about $10,000. Though the cost for 2011 has not yet been determined, Emery told council, it is being projected at about three times as much - at 85 cents per capita, or a total of $30,000.

In addition to the increased cost of materials, Emery said, the increase could be attributed to the fact that "the health department has subsidized the communities to a level they can no longer keep up."

In July, council approved a budget of $201,000 to maintain the service contract with the county board of health, about $25,000 less than it is now expected to cost.