Gahanna residents might be able to report stolen bicycles and other minor offenses to police via an online tool called Coplogic as early as summer.

Gahanna residents might be able to report stolen bicycles and other minor offenses to police via an online tool called Coplogic as early as summer.

Council is considering anappropriation in the amount of $30,450 for the purchase and installation of Coplogic, an online police-report submission-and-retrieval data service that would be available to the public.

Funding from the Federal Law Enforcement Trust Fund would cover two years of hosting services.

Technology director Tom Kneeland said the system requires no hardware or software because it is a "hosted" solution and is used for submitting and retrieving such reports as misdemeanor nonviolent crimes with low solvability factor, no-crime-involved incidents and private-property vehicle crashes.

Police Lt. Jeff Spence said a resident receiving unwanted calls or a resident who has lost a cellphone would be able to file reports online.

"We have a high call volume, and this will make it easier for residents to file low-grade reports," he said. "The reports come directly to our software. It will send an email that we received the report. It's a way of handling lesser offenses."

Spence said the system has geography files, and if someone enters a report about an incident that occurred outside Gahanna's jurisdiction, it would inform the user.

Coplogic was created by an active-duty police officer who teamed up with a senior-level software architect to create products that would assist agencies in becoming more efficient and making better use of available resources, according to its website.

Coplogic's first product, the DeskOfficer Online Reporting System, changed how agencies could handle low-priority incidents.

In six years, Coplogic's citizens online police reporting system has been launched at more than 150 agencies across North America, the website said.

Kneeland said the public would have access to the system from any Internet-enabled device, allowing self-submission of new police reports and retrieval of existing police reports directly by the public.

An on-premise kiosk also might be made available for public access for those without Internet access, according to Kneeland. The system is also multilingual. "This is really going to be a great tool for the public and our police department due to its ubiquitous accessibility," Kneeland told ThisWeek.

He said it could be ready to launch as soon as summer.

Spence said residents would be able to use the system with "ease" once it's set up.

Public-information manager Brian Hoyt said it would be prominent on the city's website at gahanna.gov.