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Girl Scout Troop 1837 spreads kindness to earn top award

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Members of Girl Scout Troop 1837 welcome Blacklick Elementary School students to school Nov. 13, World Kindness Day. Pictured are (from left) Addy Redman, Eden Weber, Bea Sull, Grace Crocker, Ruby Lobert, Avery Schanbacher, Josie Sull, Anneke Keesing and Ella Keesing.
By ThisWeek Community News  • 

It was a day to make others feel good at Blacklick Elementary School on Nov. 13.

That was World Kindness Day.

Students were greeted between 7:30 and 8 a.m. by members of Girl Scout Troop 1837 with signs, slogans and cheers, including "You're awesome" and "2nd graders are cool."

The fifth-grade junior Girl Scouts from Blacklick are working toward their Bronze Award, the highest award a junior scout can receive.

"In the process of finding a way that they could make a difference within their community, they began brainstorming ways to raise awareness about bullying in a positive way," said Melissa Sull, who's a troop leader with Mary Crocker. "They found www.randomactsofkindness.org and decided to 'kindness bomb' their classmates and teachers with handmade signs and smiles on their way into school on World Kindness Day."

After greeting students as they exited buses, the scouts told them about World Kindness Day and random acts of kindness during the school announcements.

"They gave suggestions like sitting next to someone new at lunch," Sull said. "It was really well-received."

Junior scout Bea Sull, 10, said signs were made for every grade level.

"Everyone had a sign that meant something to them," she said. "Some people held up two signs. We made a positive impact on several people's day. My sign said, 'Smiles are contagious.' We had signs to make you feel better."

Bea said requirements for the Bronze Award include making a lasting change in the community for the better, completing a workbook and putting at least 20 hours of work into a project.

"Bringing world kindness to our school is a project," she said. "It's just part of the requirement. We couldn't do the rest without this. Now our school knows what it is."

Melissa Sull said the girls had a great morning.

"They asked their classmates and teachers to pay the kindness forward and spread the smiles and kind words throughout our community," she said. "Now the next step will be to take it to the school board to see if we can have a sister holiday -- random acts of kindness -- in February."

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