Touring isn't Canadian sing-songwriter Lynn Miles favorite subject. She puts on only a few tours each year, and luckily Columbus has been one of her regular stomping grounds.

Touring isn't Canadian sing-songwriter Lynn Miles favorite subject. She puts on only a few tours each year, and luckily Columbus has been one of her regular stomping grounds.

"I'm not a 20-year-old anymore and the romance of sleeping in a two star hotel has worn off me," Miles said in a recent phone interview from her home. "I don't love touring anymore but if I can get a great show like this one, I'll go for the weekend and make an event out of it."

Miles, who has been recording since the late '80s, will perform at 7:30 p.m. June 7 at the Columbus Maennerchor, 966 South High St. It will be the final show of the 2008 Zeppelin Productions schedule.

With five CDs under her belt, Miles has racked up accolades that include having Billboard Magazine name her 1996 effort "Slightly Haunted" one of 10 best albums of the year for the singer-songwriter genre.

Miles, who will be putting on a solo concert, expects to play cuts from a new album she's working on as well as older songs.

Most recently, she took her first step toward becoming a producer. She spent two months in the Arctic producing "The Yukon Women in Music Project," which is expected to hit stores this September.

"This is the first time that I really stepped in and did everything," Miles said. "It's kind of something that I really want to do a lot more of."

Luckily, her time with the project has garnered her two more producing opportunities.

She said she arranged instruments and sang on the album.

Still, one of the biggest revelations to come from the process was a reaffirmation in herself.

"It was interesting for me to do this because basically everything that I know as a musician I had to use," Miles said. "Everything that I've every learned as an artist I got to use; there's something really validating that I didn't actually waste my life."

Miles plays what some describe as melancholy music that can straddle pop and folk.

Though she said this isn't a mischaracterization, neither is it completely accurate.

"There's some melancholy but there is also some other stuff in there like redemption," she said.

"I like people to take a chance and listen to it and decide for themselves if it is melancholy," Miles continued. "For some people it might be soothing."

Yet Miles said she recognizes a tendency to dig into raw emotions; it's something she tries to offset at her concerts.

"I know that exists, so in my shows I'm actually funny," she said. "If I play a really wrenching, horrible, bitter song I say something to crack people up. If you are going to get in there and sing about these things that might be raw for people or close to the heart, then it is only fair to give them something to laugh about."

Tickets are $20 and are available or calling Alec Wightman at 462-2636 or 222-0999.

dcross@thisweeknews.com