A German Village resident known for promoting a plethora of singer-songwriter concerts in Columbus has branched out into the recording business.

A German Village resident known for promoting a plethora of singer-songwriter concerts in Columbus has branched out into the recording business.

Alec Wightman, president of Zeppelin Productions and the offshoot Zeppelin Recordings, helped fund the release of "Fewer Things," the latest CD by Columbus regular and Texas native Katy Moffatt.

The album, which will only be available through Moffatt's Web site and at her concerts, will be released Nov. 1.

An avid music lover, Wightman's foray into the music business started in the mid 1990s when he organized a concert for musician Tom Russell. He now promotes several concerts a year at the Columbus Maennerchor.

"In the course of that I have become good friends of artists that have come through here and certainly with Katy," Wightman said.

Wightman said Moffatt is a family friend and the idea for the album started from there.

"Katy hasn't had a new record of any type in a few years and I said to her a few years ago if she ever needed any help putting a record together she should talk to me," Wightman said. "She called and asked if I was serious about it."

The album, produced by guitarist Andrew Hardin, includes 11 tracks. The two previously worked together on Moffatt's "Walkin' on the Moon" and "Angel Town."

Moffatt and Hardin will play the Maennerchor February 14.

The mostly acoustic album includes songs written by sing-songwriter Pat McLaughlin, Stephen Bruton, Nick Lowe and John Hiatt.

This will be the first time the song "Midwester" -- by Hiatt -- will appear on an album. It was originally given to Moffatt as a demo in the '70s.

Russell will also make an appearance on the CD on the tracks, "She's All He Ever Sees In Me" and "Whistlin' in the Dark."

Moffatt started her musical career in the late '70s on Columbia records, and received rave reviews from critics.

Wightman said he's unsure if he will do another recording, but won't rule it out.

"I don't know," Wightman said. "It's a little bit like the concerts I do -- this isn't' all the money in the world to make one of these -- I suppose I could do this again."

Still, he added one condition.

"I would only do it for people whose music I love," Wightman said.