There are a plethora of possibilities for New Year resolutions, from the typical to the obscure. But each promise offers insight into one's life.

There are a plethora of possibilities for New Year resolutions, from the typical to the obscure. But each promise offers insight into one's life.

Below are New Year resolutions from five area residents:

Jody Graichen, director of preservation programs, has had a busy year, stepping in as interim director for the society. As such, her resolution will be to enjoy her free time a bit more.

"I think my New Year's Resolution for 2009 will be to spend more time with family and friends and get out and enjoy German Village more," Graichen said. "I think it will be good to get out of the Meeting Haus and take a break from work."

Anyone who knows Tim Dick, owner of Schmidt's Fudge Haus, would be comfortable saying the man is beyond gregarious. It's no surprise then that his resolution falls in line with his personality.

"I want to stay focused and positive," Dick said. "With so many Americans that are unsure, I want to remain positive and optimistic so at least they feel that it is going to be OK.

"My resolution is to go into '09 with an optimistic, positive feeling; that way those around who are doubtful might be reassured," Dick said.

Erin O'Donnell, the new executive director for the German Village Society, has a resolution that only area residents may appreciate.

As part of her preparation for taking over the nonprofit, O'Donnell browsed through a membership survey and found her resolution.

"I think my New Year's Resolution was to keep my front brick sidewalks free of weeds," O'Donnell said.

"That was one of the top three things that people made comments on," O'Donnell said. "Everybody said we are supposed to be a beautiful place to walk around and everyone needs to make an example."

"It's something I struggle with each year. I've even been out there with a pizza cutter trying to get in between the bricks."

Sarah Irvin Clark, a society board member and public relation specialist, has set her sights on something most people can sympathize with. She doesn't want to work nights.

"We'll see how long that works out for me, but I'm really going to try," Clark said.

Rev. Jim Donnan, of Livingston United Methodist Church, took a different approach. Instead of a resolution, he is praying for local residents who helped the church throughout 2008.

"It's not so much a resolution but more a blessing prayer," Donnan said. "I'm so grateful for the German Village community and the German Village business community and their giving of food to the food pantry.

"I want the Lord to show special favor to all those kind souls," Donnan said.

Though 2008 brought difficult economic times, Donnan said his church's food pantry continued to feed the less fortunate because area residents were willing to continue donating items.

"I'm so grateful for how the village and the business community have stepped up," he said.