St. Mary School is fast approaching one of its student body's favorite part of the school year. Next week the school will celebrate National Right To Read Week with a number of activities.

St. Mary School is fast approaching one of its student body's favorite part of the school year. Next week the school will celebrate National Right To Read Week with a number of activities.

"Every single year, it's the highlight of the year," said sixth-grade student Lauren Elliott.

Throughout the school year, each class has been immersed in this year's theme of farming. The coming week is expected to be a showcase of student's knowledge and is the culmination of a year of learning.

Among the activities the school has planned will be hay rides through the area and a Family Reading Festival, among others.

"Every year (the students) are so immersed in it," said school librarian Annie Ruefle, organizer of the event. "I feel like, months or years to come, that when they see farms they will connect it to this."

Ruefle said she wanted students to understand the importance of farming.

"We have really impressed on the kids that you can't put anything in your mouth that doesn't come from a farm," she said.

One hundred years ago, she said, 40 percent of the American population farmed. Today, that's only 1.7 percent.

"We owe such a debt to the farms that feed us," she said.

Ruefle said current fourth-grade student Edie Collins suggested the theme last school year.

She said before the school year starts staff begin figuring out how to incorporate the theme into the academic year.

"I think we tend to do a pretty over-the-top celebration," Ruefle said.

But this year's theme was particular difficult, she said.

"The more we brainstormed with multiple classes, it seemed like there was a whole lot to cover. In fact, it was almost too much," Ruefle said. "We could have covered it for two years."

A few examples of what the student's studied:

Fifth-grade students studied the history of American agriculture and the commodities produced in each state.

Sixth-grade students, who typically study ancient history, learned the agricultural history of civilizations such as the Egyptians, Romans and Mayans.

One of the newest traditions at the school is painting a vehicle to coincide with the event. Last year, students painted a boat, while the year before they painted a Volkswagen Bug.

This year St. Mary Church parishioner Larry Badurina donated a tractor and trailer for the students to display in front of the school.

"I kind of lucked out that three years in a row that there's been a vehicle associated with it," Ruefle said. "German Village is so great with people walking around. People stop and talk and ask about the school and what we are doing. It's a great community focal point for the kids."

Ruefle said the week is designed to show students that reading is vital.

"It's to promote literacy and to show that reading really touches every part of the world," Ruefle said. "When they are researching they are reading, and when they are reading literature they are reading, and when they are on the Internet they are reading."