The Ganther's Place neighborhood is continuing its revitalization effort with the addition of a mural on the side of an empty building.

The Ganther's Place neighborhood is continuing its revitalization effort with the addition of a mural on the side of an empty building.

Ganther's Place, just west of German Village, last week unveiled a mural it had commissioned to act as a signpost for area. It was featured this past weekend during the neighborhood's fifth annual garden tour.

"When you see this, it's like saying you are in Ganther's Place," said Allen Carrel, a spokesman for the neighborhood. "The significance of it is to show the pride in our neighborhood. This neighborhood has been a long time in the making."

The mural, drawn freehand, was painted by Cleveland artist Walter Neil at 780 S. Parsons Ave. It is a compilation of images including an archway, an image of a local park and flowers, among other things.

"It's very bright in color," Carrel said.

The mural was made possible by the United Way.

Ganther's Place received a $7,000 beautification grant from the nonprofit, which was split among the mural, computers and a plant giveaway.

Carrel said there are plans to continue the mural in the future.

"Next year we'd like to do the whole front of the building," he said. "We want to use this whole building as a feature of the Parsons Avenue revitalization."

Jack Wendell, who represents the owners of the building, said he jumped at the chance to take part in the project.

"It looks better than just a plain building," Wendell said. "It brings the building into the community. To have businesses and community neighbors work together like this is a forward moving step.

"We are glad that we had the opportunity to take part in the community enrichment," he added.

Ganther's Place encompasses Reinhard Avenue, and Siebert and Whittier streets.

It has received numerous grants from the United Way as well as a grant from Keep Columbus Beautiful.

The group is in some ways an outgrowth of a block watch and the efforts of Carrel and Ken Williams, president of the Ganther's Place Block Watch and Garden Club.

Five years ago, local residents created a block watch and soon received a beautification grant.

Among the successes of the group was the creation of the Ganther's Park for All People, considered the focal point of the area.

The park was dedicated last year and features art by student from Stewart Elementary School.

"This is the type of pride that I love about this neighborhood: We are getting work done and it's all volunteers," Carrel said.