Area resident Ryan Orewiler, founder of the German Village Art League, will hold an art exhibition during the Short North Gallery Hop next month.

Area resident Ryan Orewiler, founder of the German Village Art League, will hold an art exhibition during the Short North Gallery Hop next month.

A painter, Orewiler will present about 20 pieces in the exhibition titled "Urban Expressions." The show will run Nov. 7 though Dec. 20 at Marcia Evans Gallery, 8 E. Lincoln St. An artist reception will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at the gallery.

"The city has always been my muse," Orewiler wrote in his artist's statement. "The overall quality within each city has its own source of uniqueness. The energy, the cars, the people, the layering of buildings, the noise and smell of each city makes it distinct."

Among the landscapes that will be depicted will be scenes from southern and northern Indonesia, Italy, Japan and Chicago. There will also be several paintings showing local landmarks, such as the now closed Wonder Bread Bakery and the Smith Brothers building.

"Basically, this is a whole new series of cityscape paintings from the places I've traveled around the world," Orewiler said. He said most of the pieces are a combination of oil paint and collage.

Added to the paintings will be collage-type adornments, which were pieced together from items Orewiler collected in the various locations. For example, he said, many of his Columbus paintings have parts of maps with them.

A Columbus College of Art and Design graduate, Orewiler has predominately painted landscapes for several years.

"I've painted them pretty much since 2000," Orewiler said. "I've always been interested in their architecture. Mainly, I just focus on the layering of buildings and how visually they become abstract."

Orewiler said he has worked on the series for about a year, using photographs he took while traveling.

He said his goal was to draw viewers into the scenes.

"I try to brighten up a lot of the colors to energize the viewers," he said.

Orewiler said he didn't begin to take art seriously until an accident in high school prevented him from playing some sports.

"Basically, I didn't know I was going to be a painter for a career until I was 18," he said.

Though Orewiler was unsure of his career path, art was always a part of his life.

"I was raised by an art teacher and there were several other artists in the family," Orewiler said.