Despite the noisy protestations of a few, German Village residents have been pretty accepting of the new recycling carts.

Despite the noisy protestations of a few, German Village residents have been pretty accepting of the new recycling carts.

Erin Miller, environmental steward for the city of Columbus, said 46 of 2,271 households in the T-21 geographical area, which includes parts of Schumacher Place and the Brewery District, refused the carts, meaning they didn't take in the receptacles or asked the city to remove them.

That's a 97.9 percent participation rate, slightly lower than the 98.5 percent participation rate in all of Phase II, which has 56,500 households.

"It's really good," Miller said. "We knew we wouldn't be able to hit 100 percent, but we're happy with 98 percent."

Bi-weekly collection began July 31.

Some German Village residents have spoken against the carts, saying they didn't fit the smaller properties in the village.

Many were calling for the city to offer smaller receptacles, which wasn't an option, officials said.

Shiloh Todorov, director of the German Village Society, said lost in the debate is a sincere desire to recycle by villagers.

"There are a few I've heard from that would like a smaller container that fits better with their porchless, garageless, yardless cottages -- but even those people want to recycle," she said.

"They'd just like something that fits their property and can be hidden more easily."

Norman Hall, a member of the German Village Society Board of Trustees, was one of the outspoken critics of the 64-gallon containers.

He said there are many one- and two-person households in the community that don't need such a large bin and don't have a place to put it, so he encourages people to share with their neighbors.

Still, he hasn't returned his cart.

"Yes I am using the bigger size, but hoping out hope we'll get smaller sizes offered," he said.