For the first time in four years, the German Village Society has drafted an update to its historic preservation values.

For the first time in four years, the German Village Society has drafted an update to its historic preservation values.

The document, although not binding, emphasizes key areas the Society's leadership believes are vital in preserving the area's architectural heritage, said Chris Hune, chairwoman of the society's Historic Preservation Committee.

"We're trying to reinforce the values that are important to German Village," she said.

And, keeping with custom, the Society presented the latest value statement to the German Village Commission, the local architectural review board that operates under a separate set of guidelines.

Jay Panzer, chairman of the commission, said he's pleased with the society's "reinvigorated discussion about historic preservation."

"There will, of course, continue to be various perspectives on what is best for our path forward as well as in keeping with the guidelines and laws that regulate development in our historic neighborhoods," Panzer said. "These are topics that deserve to remain on the front burner."

Hune said the document doesn't stray too far from others in the past.

However, there is a re-emphasis of new builds, additions and garages.

She said the issue was partially addressed by the commission after its June meeting, when a group of disgruntled Villagers signed a petition regarding a decision by the German Village Commission to allow construction of a house with modern design elements on South Sixth Street.

They complained the structure was not "complementary to the historic integrity of the architecture of the original houses in German Village."

Hune said it's always a good idea for the Society to affirm its historic preservation principles, even as architecture evolves and people's attitudes change.

"As people come into our community from other places they have their own attitudes of things they can do to their homes," she said.

"But they come into an historic neighborhood that has architectural review."

She said she doesn't know why the practice was stopped, but it dates back to a time when the commission was undergoing significant changes.

"It wasn't intentional," she said. "I think people forgot it was part of the process. It kind of fell by the wayside."