The Grandview Heights Planning Commission Wednesday discussed but took no action on a proposal to reconsider one of the conditions set for a mixed use development planned for the corner of Grandview Avenue and Dublin Road.

The Grandview Heights Planning Commission Wednesday discussed but took no action on a proposal to reconsider one of the conditions set for a mixed use development planned for the corner of Grandview Avenue and Dublin Road.

The commission Nov. 19 approved Metropolitan Partners' major site plan for the Grandview Station development, with several conditions, including that the plan include a sharper turning radius on the corner of Grandview and Dublin.

At Wednesday's meeting, director of building and zoning John Kuss requested the commission reconsider that condition.

Kuss suggested large semi-trucks could have difficulty turning onto Grandview Avenue from Dublin Road with a smaller radius and could endanger pedestrians if their vehicles went over the curb as they turned.

The trucks could also weave into a portion of the left turn lane on Dublin Road while making the turn, he said.

Commission chairman George Acock said he believes the turn radius should be 40 feet and questioned how many trucks would be making the turn in any event.

Most trucks bypass Dublin Road and use I-670, he said.

A 40-foot turn radius would "make it very, very tight" for trucks making the turn onto Grandview Avenue, Fire Marshal Steve Shaner said.

Commission member Jamie Greene noted that the city's master plan for the Grandview Avenue/Dublin Road area indicates a desire for the intersection to be pedestrian-friendly.

If the city is serious about that, he said, then a larger turn radius would be excessive.

One of the main reasons for a sharper radius is to slow down vehicles making the turn onto Grandview Avenue, Greene said.

While the desire to make the Grandview Avenue/Dublin Road area more pedestrian-friendly is nice, it is also probably unattainable, said P'Elizabeth Koelker, city council's representative to the planning commission.

The commission agreed to a suggestion from Patrik Bowman, the city's director of administration/economic development Patrik Bowman's suggestion that the condition be kept in place for now while a comprehensive study of the issue be conducted.

"Maybe we missed the mark and maybe (the intersection) can't be conducive to pedestrian orientation," Greene said. "But the aspirations we have written up suggest we don't want it to be hostile to pedestrians.

"That's what should drive us: what are our planning aspirations," he said. "Then you can decide if you want to make it easier for trucks to get around there or do some sort of compromise.

"The study should be driven by our aspirations," Greene said.

"I want this to feel like a pedestrian environment," Acock said.

afroman@thisweeknews.com