Nationwide Realty Investors is expected to make a presentation about the first phase of the Grandview Yard project at the March 18 Grandview Planning Commission meeting.

Nationwide Realty Investors is expected to make a presentation about the first phase of the Grandview Yard project at the March 18 Grandview Planning Commission meeting.

Patrik Bowman, the city's director of administration/economic development, told the commission at a Feb. 18 workshop that the proposed first phase would likely include a development of at least three buildings on about four to six acres on the Goodale Boulevard side of the project area.

The developer may have filed its application by the time of the commission's next workshop on March 4, he said.

The commission is holding the workshops to prepare for the process of considering the first phase of the Yard and discuss a planning analysis for the Grandview Commerce District, which includes the project area.

The developer has indicated it intends to present a plan that would use the existing M-1 light industrial district zoning, Bowman said, and will present a request for a site plan review, conditional use permits and platting at the March 18 meeting.

Nationwide is telling the city that the overall market conditions are "very unstable," he said, and at this point planning for the project must go on a phase by phase basis.

The city will work with the developer over the next few months to create a comprehensive planning document for the project area, Bowman said. Potential options include the use of overlays or specific zoning districts.

Ultimately, a long range zoning solution needs to be found for the site that will be compatible with the city's overall plan and fit in with other areas of the city, said Greg Dale, the Cincinnati-based planning and zoning consultant assisting the city with issues relating to the Grandview Yard project.

The long range solution would "lay out the concept of what is trying to be achieved there, the process and all that goes into creating a zoning tool that brings predictability for the city and flexibility for Nationwide to respond to the market," Dale said.

"In the long run, you don't want to do this through a patchwork quilt of a site plan review and conditional uses," he said.

Dale said he will be working with both the city and developer to create the comprehensive zoning solution for the project area.

The key to success "will be finding the sweet spot balance between the city's need to know what's coming and Nationwide's need to be flexible with the market," he said.

A comprehensive engineering plan will also have to be worked out with the developer and adjacent property owners, Bowman said.

"With engineering, we don't want to end up saying, 'oops, why didn't we think about that two or three years ago,'" he said.

A traffic study will also be needed to help create a plan for how motorists will circulate into and out of Grandview Yard, Bowman said.

Nationwide would conduct the traffic study, which would be reviewed by the city, he said.

Dale told planning commission members they need to review the sections of city code addressing site plan approval, conditional use permits and approval of plats.

There probably has not been a plat application for at least 20 years in Grandview, he said, "so that will be really new to you."

afroman@thisweeknews.com