The Grandview Parks and Recreation's annual Safetyview Heights program will wrap up Friday with a second group of youngsters receiving diplomas for completing the class.

The Grandview Parks and Recreation's annual Safetyview Heights program will wrap up Friday with a second group of youngsters receiving diplomas for completing the class.

Students entering kindergarten or first grade learned how to be safe at home, school and play at Safetyview Heights, which was divided into two separate one-week classes. The program was held the past two weeks at McKinley Field.

"Around here, it seems most of the children have already been told by their parents how to be safe, but sometimes, especially at that age, you can kind of forget what you've been told," Safetyview Heights instructor Nancy Kukla said.

"We're trying to reinforce the safety skills they've already been taught," she said.

The program includes a variety of activities and arts and crafts projects designed to teach safety, Kukla said.

A portion of the McKinley Field parking lot was turned into a model city scene to allow the children a chance to practice being safe on the sidewalks and streets, she said.

Grandview police and fire personnel also visited, bringing their safety equipment, offering safety tips and talking about their duties.

Along with their diploma, each child also received a scrapbook put together by Kukla. Each scrapbook collects the art projects the student completed during Safetyview Heights and includes photographs of the youngster taken during the program.

"I don't know if they will be that excited about getting the scrapbook right now, but when they're graduating from high school and their mothers pull this out, I think they'll enjoy looking at it," Kukla said.

Several Grandview middle school and high school students served as volunteers for this year's program.

"We couldn't do this program without the help of our volunteers, especially here at the park," Kukla said. "They do such a great job."

The first week's volunteers included seventh-graders Alexis Lower, Madison Osborne and Emma Bulla.

Bulla said she decided to volunteer "because I love little kids. I think they are adorable.

"Instead of just sitting around the house, it was nice to be able be part of something that helps kids," she said.

Lower didn't grow up in Grandview and her community didn't have a program like Safetyview Heights.

"I wish that they had a program like this, because I think it would have been really helpful," she said.

Osborne said she participated in Safetyview Heights when she was younger and she thought it would be fun to take part as a volunteer.

"I've liked all of it," she said of the volunteer experience. "It's kind of fun to see how the kids are excited and how they react to things."

"It's just so much fun helping the kids," Lower said. "They have such great personalities."

Many of the youngsters look up to the teen volunteers and form bonds with their elders, Bulla said.

"They latch on to somebody and they really listen to what they have to tell them," she said.

All three of the girls say they plan to sign up to volunteer at next year's Safetyview Heights program.

"It's brought back a lot of memories of when I was here as a little kid," Bulla said. "There have been some changes and it has a different name, but it's still a really fun program."