The Grandview Heights Board of Education gave five thumbs up Thursday in its annual evaluation of Superintendent Ed O'Reilly.

The Grandview Heights Board of Education gave five thumbs up Thursday in its annual evaluation of Superintendent Ed O'Reilly.

"We're very pleased with Ed. He's worked well with us over the last year," board president Kathy Lithgow said.

"We could not have picked a better superintendent" when O'Reilly was hired nearly three years ago, she said.

Already doing an excellent job, O'Reilly has become an even more effective leader over the past year, Lithgow said.

The evaluation the board unanimously adopted lists O'Reilly's notable strengths as including his awareness of current trends in curriculum and instruction methods, his role as part of the team that negotiated contracts with the district's teachers and classified staff and his effort in preparing a school compensation agreement with the city for the Grandview Yard project.

O'Reilly "demonstrates a firm belief in leadership by collaboration and communication," the evaluation states.

"He's very easy for us to work with," Lithgow said.

The evaluation notes O'Reilly's progress in each of the goals set for him last year. Those goals will continue for the 2009-10 school year and the board is adding two others.

The new goals are to continue to be mindful of the district's financial situation given the current economy, new state biennial budget, federal monies and the eventual need to seek a school tax levy and to find ways to delegate tasks to lighten his load without overburdening the administrative staff.

O'Reilly told the board he has added two more goals himself.

First, he wants to make sure the community understands the importance of the district's permanent improvements levy, which expires at the end of next year, and how the funds generated from the current levy have been effectively used, O'Reilly said.

He said he also plans to spend more time in the classroom this school year.

His visits to classrooms were limited this past year because so much was going on in the district, O'Reilly said.