When the Glass Axis studio holds its spring sale this weekend, patrons will not only be able to purchase a variety of fine glass art, they will be able to create their own sculpted glass flower.

When the Glass Axis studio holds its spring sale this weekend, patrons will not only be able to purchase a variety of fine glass art, they will be able to create their own sculpted glass flower.

The event will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at the studio, 1341-B Norton Ave.

"The spring sale is one of three big sales we usually have each year," Glass Axis executive director Eva Ball said. "We'll have about 28 artists who are members of our studio selling hand-crafted glass art and jewelry."

The workshop held throughout the spring sale weekend will give visitors ages 12 and up the chance to learn from Glass Axis instructors and make their own glass sculpture.

The workshops will be held from noon to 5 p.m. each day during the sale and cost $35. Registration is not required.

Glass Axis studio was founded in 1987 by 12 graduates of Ohio State University's glass program, said Kami Meighan, president of the studio's board of trustees.

"They decided they wanted their own place," Meighan said. "At first, they had a portable glass-blowing unit they used to demonstrate glass art, especially in schools."

The studio members established their own facility in 1992 in the area now known as the Arena District, she said. The group moved into the larger Norton Avenue studio in 2001.

Education has always been a major focus of Glass Axis, which is a nonprofit organization, Meighan said.

"It's been pretty amazing that we've been around for so long as a nonprofit, self-sustaining studio," Ball said.

Glass Axis now has more than 200 members and offers both warm and hot glass facilities as well as a cold shop for grinding and polishing for rental, she said. Users must be members of the studio.

"There's almost always someone in here working on something," Meighan said.

Glass art is a collaborative effort, in which others' assistance is needed, she said.

"I think that's one of the best aspects of it," Meighan said. "It's the chance to work with others on a project."

Making art objects out of glass "is a really addictive process," she said. "It's the challenge, the struggle of working the glass. The glass isn't always going to do what you want or expect it to do. There's a lot of problem solving involved."

An artist can work long and hard on a piece and be at the very end of the process only to see the glass fall to the floor and the project be a failure, Meighan said.

"When you finish a piece, it's a great feeling," she said.

Watching glass artists use fire to mold the glass "is just magical," Ball said. "People who come in to watch, they often can''t take their eyes off it."

Each month, the studio holds a Last Saturday Demo, during which visitors can watch as a glass artist demonstrates their craft.

"We hold it on the last Saturday to tie in with the Grandview Hop," Ball said.

Later this year, Glass Axis will be remodeling the front of its studio to make the gallery a more pleasing space for visitors, she said.

More information about Glass Axis, including a calendar of classes, workshops and special events, is available at www.glassaxis.org.

afroman@thisweeknews.com