The community had an opportunity last Friday to check out the renovations made to the Grandview Heights High School media center.

The community had an opportunity last Friday to check out the renovations made to the Grandview Heights High School media center.

The school held a reception that was attended by former members of the Brotherhood of the Rooks, a now-defunct GHHS fraternal organization.

The improvements were funded through a $60,000 donation by the Rooks.

More than 500 GHHS students belonged to the Brotherhood of the Rooks during its history, said former fraternity member and 1951 alum Tom Bogen.

The organization started in 1915 and was an active part of the high school until 1961, when a new state law banned high school fraternities in Ohio, he said.

"We had a house on Elmwood Avenue that served as our fraternity house," said Dick Keitz, also a member of the Class of '51. "When the house was sold in 1963, the proceeds were used to establish an endowment fund."

In subsequent decades, the fund was used to offer scholarships to Grandview students, he said.

"But we're all getting older and we weren't sure how much longer we could continue to conduct the scholarship program," said Dirk Voelker, Class of 1950.

When the organization contacted GHHS principal Jesse Truett about how the remaining money in the fund could best be used, he suggested the library project, Keitz said.

"The nice thing about the library project is that it's a way for the Rooks to benefit a lot more students than just giving out a few scholarships each year," Bogen said.

The media center renovations include repainting and the installation of a new ceiling and flooring. A wall was removed to create a separate area for computers and other technology, and a new multi-purpose room was created where small groups can meet, students take tests or small classes can be held.

The traditional media center space was opened up and features a new circulation desk and an informal area where students can read and study.

Truett said that when he became principal two years ago, it was quickly apparent to him that the media center was in dire need of renovation.

"What's great with the redesign of the space is that now we can have several things going on at one time," he said. "Before, we really only had room for one activity at a time."

Students have been pleased with the improvements, Truett said.

"They've really been excited to see the changes," he said.