The bidding process for the preschool classroom addition at Stevenson Elementary is expected to begin by mid-November.

The bidding process for the preschool classroom addition at Stevenson Elementary is expected to begin by mid-November.

Superintendent Ed O'Reilly provided an update on the project at the Grandview Heights Board of Education's Sept. 21 meeting.

"We are still planning an August 2011 move-in date," O'Reilly said.

The project will involve building a 647-square-foot classroom for special needs students.

The original plan for a 2,000-square-foot addition was scaled back to meet the board's desire that the entire cost of the project be covered by $285,931 in federal stimulus money for special needs students awarded to the district, along with other federal grants.

The board approved the revised plan in April.

The special needs preschool classroom is currently located in the sixth-grade hallway at Edison Intermediate Middle School.

O'Reilly told the board Sept. 21 that soil sampling has been completed and preliminary reports indicate the site can support the addition. A final written report is pending, he said.

Engineers are working with project architect MKC Associates to plan foundation, electrical and mechanical systems, O'Reilly said. The district will advertise for bids starting in mid-November.

The project is still on target to meet all deadlines set for projects receiving stimulus money through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, O'Reilly said.

The budget for the project will require no district funds, he said.

Room was left in the contract to allow for additional square footage if bids come back lower than expected, O'Reilly said.

One small adjustment to the project design was made that will add a little more than 60 square feet, he said.

The addition will be built in the Stevenson courtyard area facing First Avenue.

O'Reilly proposed moving the special needs preschool classroom in order to place the students in a more age-appropriate setting and provide them with more opportunities for peer models and exposure to regular classrooms.

afroman@thisweeknews.com