As the time to register children for next year's kindergarten program approaches, the Grandview Heights City School District may have to consider a number of issues before the process can begin.

As the time to register children for next year's kindergarten program approaches, the Grandview Heights City School District may have to consider a number of issues before the process can begin.

Superintendent Ed O'Reilly reviewed issues regarding the kindergarten program at the Dec. 13 board of education meeting.

Traditionally, the district has offered a tuition-free half-day program and a tuition-based full-day kindergarten class, O'Reilly said.

Current state law requires districts to offer tuition-free all-day kindergarten option as well as a tuition-free half-day program in 2011-12, he said. Parents could request the program of their choice.

The pending plan for next school year is that parents will have the both all-day and half-day, both tuition-free, O'Reilly said.

One question that will have to be answered, he said, is how small a class size is too small for an appropriate kindergarten experience.

O'Reilly said he and Stevenson Elementary principal Brian Bowser will work with staff and bring a recommendation to the board at its January meeting.

Another issue is the potential change to the Ohio Evidence Based Model, he said. The law behind this model required districts to offer tuition-free all-day kindergarten.

Governor-elect John Kasich has indicated he intends to eliminate the school funding model implemented by outgoing Gov. Ted Strickland. If that occurs, the board will have to make a decision regarding charging tuition for the all-day program, O'Reilly said.

The district won't know for certain until June, when a new two-year state budget is passed, whether it will be able to be able to offer a tuition-free all-day kindergarten program, he said.

A repeal of the tuition-free requirement and potential large budget cuts for education could result in a late impact on the district's ability to offer a tuition free all-day program, O'Reilly said.

The uncertainty as kindergarten registration begins could make it difficult for parents to plan, but the budget situation could also cause difficulty for the school district, he said.

Despite the uncertainty, O'Reilly told the board, he would recommend the district offer all-day kindergarten in some form next school year.

In other business last week, the board approved creating the position of Project MORE coordinator at a rate of pay not to exceed $20 per hour for up to 150 hours.

The position will be fully paid for using federal Title I funds. District money will not be needed.

Project MORE (Mentoring in Ohio for Reading Excellence) is a reading mentorship program in which seventh- and eighth-grade students are paired with fourth- and fifth-grade students who need help improving their reading skills.

The program will begin next month in Grandview.

More than 130 schools around Ohio are participating in Project MORE.