Although Gov. John Kasich has presented his proposed two-year state budget, Grandview and other school districts will be going on a roller coaster ride the next few months until a final budget is passed.

Although Gov. John Kasich has presented his proposed two-year state budget, Grandview and other school districts will be going on a roller coaster ride the next few months until a final budget is passed.

"We're getting different numbers almost every day," Grandview Heights City Schools treasurer Tammy Rizzo said.

About the only thing certain is that the numbers will change and evolve during the budget process, she said.

State legislators must pass a balanced budget by June 30 and Ohio is facing a projected $8-billion deficit heading into the biennium budget.

"Of course, the last state budget wasn't passed until mid-July," Rizzo said.

The governor is proposing a 1.9-percent increase in state funding for schools, but that is more than offset by his proposal to eliminate $454 million in federal stimulus funding districts have received in the current fiscal year.

According to Office of Budget and Management documents, Grandview would see a 24.3-percent decrease in state basic aid in 2012 under the governor's proposed budget.

The district is receiving $1,591,540 in 2011. Its state funding would drop to $1,219,192 in 2012 under the governor's proposal. Grandview's funding would increase by 5.8 percent in 2013 to $1,290,275.

The district anticipated the proposed decrease in state funding in its latest financial forecast, Rizzo said.

What was unexpected was the size of the governor's proposed reduction in the tangible personal property tax replacement payments districts receive from the state, she said. The tax is no longer being paid in Ohio.

The payment program reimburses school districts for the lost revenue and was expected to last through 2018.

Kasich's budget proposal would reduce the payments by 37.2 percent in 2012, Rizzo said.

Grandview is receiving $1.4 million through the payment program in 2011, she said.

In addition, the budget proposes cutting the reimbursement to schools for the reduced rate for certain personal property of public utilities by 62.7 percent next year, Rizzo said.

Grandview is receiving $420,000 in utilities reimbursement funds this year, she said.

"We weren't anticipating those kind of reductions," Rizzo said. "It would have an impact on our budget."

The proposed reductions in the reimbursements would be in addition to the federal stimulus reduction and are not included in the state foundation estimates for the next two years.

But it is much too early to know what the final budget impact on the district will be, she said.

"During the last budget process, the proposed numbers changed at least a dozen times," Rizzo said.

The uncertainty, "makes it difficult to plan our financial future," she said.

Grandview is fortunate that it is at the beginning of a new three-year operating levy that was approved by voters last November, Rizzo said.