Grandview Heights City Council approved a resolution Jan. 17 supporting the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission's Olentangy Watershed Balanced Growth Plan.

Grandview Heights City Council approved a resolution Jan. 17 supporting the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission's Olentangy Watershed Balanced Growth Plan.

David Rutter, watershed coordinator for MORPC, presented an overview of the plan during the recreation, services and public facilities committee meeting held prior to the council session.

Grandview is one of 27 participating jurisdictions in the watershed area, which spans Franklin, Delaware, Morrow and Marion counties, Rutter said.

The plan was developed through a watershed planning partnership comprised of the jurisdictions, he said. It has gone through an extensive public review process and MORPC is now seeking resolutions of support from each of the participating jurisdictions, Rutter said.

A total of 75 percent of the jurisdictions, representing 75 percent of the watershed area's population and 75 percent of the total acreage within the watershed, must support the plan in order for it to be presented for state endorsement, he said.

The high threshold of support needed for the plan helps ensure "that one community cannot dominate another area," Rutter said.

Thirteen communities had passed resolutions of support as of Jan. 17, and three were set to vote that night, he said.

The remaining communities will be voting on whether to support the plan next month, Rutter said.

Most of Grandview is included as a priority development area in the watershed.

The plan shows priority conservation areas, priority development areas and priority agricultural areas throughout the Olentangy watershed, Rutter said.

In the designated development areas "we wanted to encourage development where investments have already been made," he said.

"I believe the map should match up well with the planning and zoning you have in Grandview."

The administration supports the plan's recommendations, said Patrik Bowman, the city's director of administration/economic development.

The map for Grandview included in the plan was changed to reflect changes Grandview wanted, Rutter said.

The main change the city asked for was to switch the Kaplin Tract property from a priority conservation area to a priority development area, Bowman said.

The plan includes recommendations for 15 implementation tools communities can use as they see fit, Rutter said.

These are only recommendations, he said. The plan does not create any requirements or regulations for participating communities.

Council unanimously approved the resolution of support with no objections or concerns raised.

The complete plan can be accessed at www.balancedgrowthplanning.morpc.org.

In other business, council approved a resolution authorizing the mayor to enter into a shared services agreement with other central Ohio municipalities for fleet maintenance services.

At this time, Grandview along with Columbus, Dublin, Gahanna, Hilliard, New Albany, Upper Arlington, Worthington and Westerville have discussed participating in such an agreement.