The Grandview Heights Board of Health Jan. 26 voted to recommend that city council consider adopting an ordinance that would require restaurants in the city to visibly display signs indicating they have passed county board of health inspections.

The Grandview Heights Board of Health Jan. 26 voted to recommend that city council consider adopting an ordinance that would require restaurants in the city to visibly display signs indicating they have passed county board of health inspections.

A draft ordinance that will be forwarded to council is modeled on legislation approved last month by Bexley City Council.

Unlike regulations adopted by the city of Columbus, Grandview restaurants would not be required to display the grade they received in an inspection, but merely a notice indicating their establishment passed the inspection.

The draft ordinance states that the sign must be posted in one of three areas:

• The front window of the establishment, so as to be visible from outside and located within five feet of the front door and not less than four feet or more than six feet from the floor.

• A display case which is mounted on the outside front wall of the establishment and located within five feet of the front door and not less than four feet or more than six feet from the floor.

• A location as directed and determined at the discretion of the Franklin County Public Health to ensure proper notice to the general public and to patrons.

The legislation would also require restaurants to have a copy of the inspection report available for inspection by the public upon request.

The ordinance includes a provision that states violation of the signage requirement would be consider a third-degree misdemeanor. The penalty provision is likely a matter city council "would want to weigh in on," City Attorney Joelle Khouzam told the board.

If the city were to intend to proceed with a specified penalty, it would be best to have a prosecutor review it to make sure it is a suitable penalty, she said.

Without sanctions for violating the new law, "I don't know why you'd even have it," board member Rick Ross said.

Council President Steve Reynolds attended the meeting and said he thinks that in a small community like Grandview, people would notice if a restaurant doesn't display the sign when others do and wonder why the sign isn't posted.

"There would be a backlash," for those restaurants who don't display the sign, he said.

Board member Dhanu Sant said she doesn't understand why a restaurant would object to having to post a sign that would simply let its patrons know it has passed the health inspection.