The Grandview Heights Board of Education voted Feb. 21 to accept an 11-year permanent improvement plan for the district.

The Grandview Heights Board of Education voted Feb. 21 to accept an 11-year permanent improvement plan for the district.

The board "accepted" rather than "approved" the plan because it is only a framework for future improvement projects, Superintendent Ed O'Reilly said in an interview.

"Each project will have to be separately approved by the board," he said.

The specific projects that may be brought to the board "will be somewhat fluid," he said, because, over time, unforeseen facility needs may arise.

The projects planned for this summer include the replacement of the high school gym roof.

"The entire roof needs to be replaced," O'Reilly said. "It's at least 40 years old."

The high school track will also be resurfaced, which will require closing the track to public access for a short time, he said.

The plan accepted by the board includes projected expenditures for technology and facility needs for each fiscal year from 2011-12 through 2021-22.

The district receives about $550,000 each year from the 2 mills set aside for permanent improvements included in the levy voters approved in 2010.

In other district news, a community forum on bullying in the schools will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 13, in the Brotherhood of the Rooks Media Center at Grandview Heights High School.

The meeting will be a follow up to previous forums the district has held to address concerns parents have raised about bullying.

Building principals will attend the forum, which will give parents a chance to discuss their concerns about the issue, O'Reilly said.

One of the most helpful measures the district enacted was placing a form on its website that parents can use to report cases of bullying, he said.

The form has helped speed up the district's response to such reports, O'Reilly said.

Edison Intermediate/Middle School has put a particular emphasis on the bullying issue with an effort encouraging students to think about making the school a place "where everybody belongs," he said.