Visitors to the annual Brain Blast creativity fair Feb. 23 at the Edison Intermediate/Middle School commons had the chance to sample both sweet and sour treats.

Visitors to the annual Brain Blast creativity fair Feb. 23 at the Edison Intermediate/Middle School commons had the chance to sample both sweet and sour treats.

Students displayed their artistic, scientific and creative interests at the event, which is sponsored by the Grandview K-3 PTO. The Brain Blast is held to commemorate the birthday of Thomas Edison.

Sisters Olivia and Mary Gamble offered a dual exhibit about their favorite desserts - cake and ice cream - and offered samples of the frozen dish.

Olivia, a fourth-grader, displayed information about cake.

"It's my favorite, and it's featured in my favorite kind of TV show, 'Cake Boss,'" she said. "It shows you how they make and design all these fantastic cakes."

Olivia has tried her hand at making cakes, including a vanilla birthday cake.

"It's really fun to come up with the design," she said. "But I like eating cake as much as I like baking one. When you've made it yourself, it tastes even better."

Mary, a kindergarten student at Stevenson Elementary, said she is perhaps more partial to ice cream, which was the subject of her display.

"We went once to the Velvet factory and got to see how ice cream is made," she said. "You could get a chance to taste some ice cream and they have a playground outside. And they had a nice gift shop."

Her favorite kinds of ice cream are chocolate and vanilla.

And she likes her cake, too.

"It's the best when you get to eat cake with ice cream," Mary said.

First-grader Lily Nault was offering an opposite type of treat at her display.

She was giving out samples of lemon juice (from freshly squeezed lemons) with baking soda added.

"It makes it a little more sour," Nault said "But what's really fun is that is makes it bubbly. It's a gas, but it's a gas you can drink."

Originally, she said, she wanted to do an exhibit in which she would have mixed vinegar and baking soda together, but her mother nixed the idea.

"It would be too messy," Nault said.

Kindergarten student Freddie Keil's exhibit featured pictures and information about how Legos are made.

"I love Legos," he said. "Sometimes I play with them every day. I have a bunch of them, probably hundreds. No, it's thousands."

In his research, Keil said, he was most interested to find that high levels of heat are used to make the Lego pieces.

"I just like them because you can stack them together to make all kinds of things," he said.

He even wore his special hard hat given to him by an uncle. Dozens of Lego pieces are attached to the hat.

Fourth-grader Paige De Niro offered a display detailing the building of the Eiffel Tower, a renowned attraction in Paris, a city where she hopes someday to live.

Her display included a 3-D puzzle of the tower she completed.

"I'm really interested in fashion and I want to be a fashion designer some day," she said. "Paris is one of the capitals of fashion, so that's where I want to be."

It took more than 300 men to build the Eiffel Tower and you must climb more than 300 stairs just to get to the first level, De Niro said.

"Although I think they have an elevator you can take," she said.