The Grandview Heights Planning Commission may soon be considering whether the city's sign code needs to be revised or updated.

The Grandview Heights Planning Commission may soon be considering whether the city's sign code needs to be revised or updated.

Adam Hill-Warren, the city's planning intern, is conducting a survey of planning commission and city council members and will report on the input he receives at the next planning commission meeting on March 21.

"The current city sign code is problematic," Hill-Warren said.

"A lot of things have changed in the city" since the code was last revised, he said, and there's some question as to whether elements of the code are still appropriate or relevant.

Some signs in the city may technically violate the specific requirements or guidelines included in the code, Hill-Warren said.

The sign code was last revised about 15 years ago, when the community plan was adopted, according to Patrik Bowman, director of administration/economic development.

Various components of the code "probably don't reflect the (development) values the town has now," he said.

After 15 years, the code likely needs some refurbishing, Bowman said.

Given the amount of time since it was last updated, the code has perhaps been neglected, Hill-Warren said.

Hill-Warren has sent commission and council members photographs of more than 30 signs of various types and locations, about half in Grandview and half in other communities.

The officials are being asked to give their comments on each sign using a variety of criteria, including setback, position on a building, sign content, visibility and type of sign.

"I'm just asking them to evaluate each sign to get a feeling of what they like and don't like," Hill-Warren said. "It's a way to get the discussion started about the sign code."

Hill-Warren started his internship with the city in January. He is working under Bowman's direction.

He is a graduate student at Ohio State University working toward his master's degree in regional planning.