The Grandview Heights City School District would just miss earning the top grade under proposed new standards through which the Ohio Department of Education would rate school districts.

The Grandview Heights City School District would just miss earning the top grade under proposed new standards through which the Ohio Department of Education would rate school districts.

Superintendent Ed O'Reilly reviewed the proposed changes and how the district would fare under them at the March 20 school board meeting.

The ODE is seeking a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. In order to qualify for the waiver, the state must submit and gain approval of a new method of evaluating school districts, O'Reilly said.

The new format proposed last month by the ODE would replace the current report card, which assigns ratings ranging from excellent with distinction through academic emergency with one that would issue letter grades to districts, he said.

Districts would earn grades ranging from A through F, O'Reilly said.

Under the current system, the district earned the top rating of excellent with distinction on the 2010-11 report card. Under the proposed new system, it would have earned a B, he said.

The revamped report card would use four measures, O'Reilly said.

It would continue to include the number of state indicators met and ratings for performance index and value-added, he said.

For the fourth standard, the state is proposing to replace goals set in measuring adequate yearly progress (AYP) with a plan to cut the achievement gap in reading and mathematics by half over six years, O'Reilly said.

The achievement gap measurement would be combined with graduation rate data.

Under the new system, Grandview would have earned A grades for meeting all 26 state indicators and for meeting the value-added standard by having students achieve above expected academic growth for two years in a row.

The district would have earned B grades for its performance index score and the achievement/graduation measure, O'Reilly said.

Grandview earned a performance index score of 106.2, just under the minimum score of 108 that would have earned an A, he said.

If the district reached the 108 score, its overall report card grade would have risen to an A, O'Reilly said.

While about 300 districts earned excellent or excellent with distinction ratings on last year's report card, only 17 would have earned an A under the proposed new system, he said.

"This is a much more demanding standard," O'Reilly said.

The state's proposed changes must still be approved by the United States Department of Education, he said. A decision is expected in the next few months.