A representative of Preferred Living, a central Ohio residential property developer, presented Marble Cliff Village Council with the company's desire to build a high-end residential development on the former Custom Coach property on Dublin Road.

A representative of Preferred Living, a central Ohio residential property developer, presented Marble Cliff Village Council with the company's desire to build a high-end residential development on the former Custom Coach property on Dublin Road.

Nick King, a vice president with Preferred Living, said the company's concept is to build a pair of four-story buildings with a total of between 200 and 250 units.

"We tend to do high-density projects, anywhere from 35 to 45 units an acre," King said.

The Custom Coach site is about six acres, he said.

The development would be similar to the company's 218-unit Kenyon Square rental community located near Polaris Parkway, he said.

That development's units rent from about $800 up to $1,300 each month, but the Marble Cliff development would likely have higher rates, King said.

Kenyon Square features such amenities as a heated pool with waterfall, 24-hour health club, movie theater, Starbucks Café, a 24-hour business center and ATM and a recessed lounge with fireplace.

"Our motto is to build better communities, not just bigger," King said.

The Custom Coach property is well-suited for a residential development because "it is a great area and offers a location (where) people want to live," he said.

The property would have to be rezoned to allow a residential development, Mayor Kent Studebaker said.

In 2009, the village rezoned the property to planned development district to accommodate a proposal by Exxcel Project Management to move its operations to the site. That project did not pan out.

The four-story buildings would likely exceed the village's restrictions on building height. Lot coverage would also be an issue that would come into play, Studebaker said.

The key question is whether a residential use for the property "is of interest for council," he said.

"This council has sat around the table long enough to know we don't exactly have folks knocking down our door" to redevelop the property, Studebaker said.

After the Exxcel proposal fell through, council was presented with the idea of opening a sand volleyball facility on the site, but that never came to fruition, either.

Council members expressed general interest in the residential concept, although some expressed concern about eliminating the site from possible future commercial development.

With the hope that the economy is beginning to turn around, it's worth considering whether the village would be "committing too soon to residential" if it approved Preferred Living's proposal, council member Linda Seifkas said.

The village owns a one-acre section located toward the rear of the Custom Coach site.

Council member Matt Cincione raise the idea of the village transferring the acre it owns to Preferred Living in exchange for keeping an acre at the front of the property available for commercial development.

King said his company might be open to such an arrangement.

He said he will bring back at least a couple possible site plans and more information for council to review at its April meeting.